World War II

World War II Casualties from Brevard County

These servicemen were either from Brevard County

or had family connections in Brevard County

We have been very liberal in our definition of a Brevard County veteran. Generally, we have listed all the names inscribed on the Memorial Wall, all the names we found listed on official U. S. Government web sites as residents of Brevard County, all those with a hometown located in the county, and all those whose obituary could be found in the local newspapers.



Sources

National WWII Memorial, Washington, D.C.


American Battle Monument Commission

National Archives Access to Archival Dadabases (AAD)



Other Brevard County Casualties

World War I

Korea

Vietnam

Iraq and Afghanistan

Cold War

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Alger, M. P., Jr.
Allerton, Dennis R.
Ashurst, Alta P. Jr.
Avant, Joe R.
Baker, Thomas N.
Bell, Frank, Jr.
Bennett, Carl E.
Bevil, Wilbur
Booth, Marvin H.
Bolton, John Alden
Borowski, Frank H.
Butter, Walter R., Jr.
Carter, Madison P.
Cantrell, Joseph W.
Cooper, Gary T., Jr.
Davis, John A., Jr.
Davis, William  Shelton
DeBonis, Livio G.
Duhart, Limus
Golightly, James L.
Goodman, Sidney G.
Goodson, Eugene
Harlock, Charles
Harris, William, Jr.
Hawthorn, Charles
Hecht, Ronald R.*
Holmes, Sam D., Jr.
Hughes, Dennis T.
Jones, Guy
Keith, Jesse H.
Kleinman, John
Lay, Ernest B.
MacDowell, Carll B.
Malounek, Frank, Jr.
Mathers, Joseph W., Jr.
Newbern, Henry C.
Neyers, Kenneth T.
Norwood, Call M.
Osterreicher, T. C.*
Paterson, William Gordon
Peacock, Edward
Peacock, Derrell W.
Peckenpaugh, Edward W., Jr.
Pettis, Charles W.
Potter, Mort J.
Prahl, Robert E.
Ramage, Eugene*
Rumbley, Clyde
Seawright, Charles K.
Seymore, Erwin*
Shave, Harold T.
Singleton, Harvey
Smith, C. Elmer
Smith, Thomas Royal
Sommerchield, Lloyd H.
Stephens, Clay
Thomas, John
Vinson, Charles J.
Watts, Wesley J.
Weeks, Norris H.
Wilkinson, Thomas T.*
Williams, A. J.
Williams, Charles LeRoy*


* Listed on Memorial Wall at Brevard Community College in Cocoa, Florida but no military service information found.


 




 

2nd Lt.Maurice Plaisted Alger, Jr.
Hometown: Troy, New York
Brevard County Connection: UNKNOWN
U. S. Army
Serial: # O-438962
Service: 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion
Died Friday, July 21, 1944
Buried at Normandy American Cemetery,
Colleville-sur-Mer, France, Plot J, Row 16, Grave 4
Awarded Purple Heart
(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

____________

National WWII Memorial 
Honored By Barbara Alger Olgeirson, Sister
Honored By Ann E. Alger Melbourne, Sister
Honored by Ann M. Gaule, Niece

____________

        2nd Lt. M.P. AlGER, JR., DIES IN ACTION

        A letter from Mr. M. P. Alger, Sr., Oak Forge, New York, and Georgiana, Florida., this week gives the sad intelligence of the death of his son, 2nd Lt. M.P. Alger, Jr. on the battlefield of France on July 21st. Lt. Alger was connected with the 654th Tank Drs Bn. Lt. Alger and his mother and father considered Cocoa and Merritt Island their home since his family came from the Philippine Islands, where his father, Capt. M.P. Alger served with the Philippine Constabulary. His name appears on the Cocoa Honor Roll. Lt. Alger was born at Cebu, Philippine Island, in 1920, but graduated from Manilus School, Manilus, N.Y. He held a commission in the Reserve Corps of the Army, and entered the service in March 1942, with the 654th T.D. Bn. at Camp Gordon, Ga., until he went overseas in September 1943. Lt. Alger spent his last leave with his parents in Cocoa last September, but did not have the opportunity to complete the visit as he was called back to duty to leave for overseas duty.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE August 10, 1944, page 4)

 










 
Pfc. Dennis Richard Allerton

Hometown: Entered service from Florida

Brevard County Connection:

U. S. Army

Serial # 34531488

153 Infantry Regiment, 38the Infantry Division

Died Tuesday February 13, 1945

Buried Manila American Cemetery, Ft. Bonifacio, Manila, Philippines, Plot D., Row 10, Grave 19.

Awarded the Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

 

 



 

 

Pfc. Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr.

Hometown: Cocoa, Brevard County, Florida

U. S. Army
Serial # 34547141
Died of wounds, August 28, 1944
Awarded Purple Heart
_____________

National WWII Memorial 

Honored by Albert L. McGlaun, Friend (Citation)

Honored by Dr. R. M. Barber, Cousin (Citation)

__________________

        Alta Paul Ashurst gives account of fighting in Italy which he has seen

        The Tribune is appreciative of the letter which we received from Pfc. Alta Paul Ashurst Saturday from Italy, where the young soldier has been in the thick of things since he landed there. Despite the fact that the letter is cut by censors, it is most interesting, as out readers will find.
        Alta Paul did his training at Camp Jackson, S. C., and was there for a short time before he went overseas to get in the thick of the fighting. His letter is the first received from any of our military personnel in Italy giving a description of incidents of their lives while on the front. We print it here:

        "My dear Mr. Pound and Mrs. Holderman: You must think that I am very ungrateful for not writing to you sooner and thanking you for sending me The Tribune. I don’t blame you at all if you feel that way, but I also want you to know that I appreciate the paper very much. When we fall in for a few *** and have mail call, I nearly run over my buddies when the mail clerk holds up the paper with a *** around it and yells "Ashurst". I know that my Tribune has arrived.
        As my mother has probably told you I have been with the *** division for quite a number of months. They are quite a fine bunch of fellows and the larger portion of them hail from the state of ***. The division was originally the *** , the insignia being a *** in the center of ***. They are an easy going bunch of boys, but their pet hate seems to be the "Jerries", or, better known as the Germans in the states. We also have quite a few *** in the division that now live in Texas. The "Jerries" hold a mortal fear of them. They are quite expert with their large ***.
        The censor lets us tell whether we were in the fighting at *** or not now. I was there and all around there for quite a while. It was pretty tough there at times with hand to hand fighting being the main thing on the program. The bayonet and grenade being the main weapons. I was glad that back in training they made us do bayonet drill for more than an hour every day, rain or shine. We used to moan about it, but now we thank out lucky stars. It was in *** that we found out that the modern infantry soldier still finds the chance to use the bayonet. We beat the Germans in close fighting, as far as I could see, and at times they didn’t give us a fight at all – they just dropped their rifles and raised their hands, the majority of them being Polish and Czech. It was here that another boy and myself were lying behind some large boulders and, glancing up, saw a group of seven Germans coming around a bend in the road not fifty yards away. We were placed there to help some other boys take some prisoners back to Battalion C. P., so thinking that it was the group of prisoners coming down the road, we raised up and started toward them. Then, we saw that they were armed. A million thoughts raced through my mind and I could see the golden gates opening. For a few seconds we just stood facing each other. They then started forward on both sides of the road . We noticed that there was a machine gunner on the right side of the road and that it was useless to try to fight it out against such odds. We each had *** or better known as the *** . It fires a clip ***. They got up to us and to our surprise they started taking their cartridge belts, gas mask, and their paraphernalia off. They had come in to surrender, much to our relief. We could hardly believe it. The Germans were not over sixteen, the oldest boy being almost twenty. There were two Germans, the other five being Polish. They seemed glad to be going to a prisoner camp, but still believed that Hitler would win. On being questioned, one Polish boy could not be made to believe that the Fifth Army had made another landing below *** . They just laughed when they were told that. "Before we left them they told us that they had something to give us for not harming them. Each of them pulled out of their pack pockets a rifle cleaning kit, complete with wire brushes, oil and chain. It is in a metal case, a little larger than a tobacco can. The nazi swastika is on it with the German black eagle stamped around it. I am very proud of this kit and if the good Lord is willing I’ll drop in and show it to you when I get home.
        " A few days later, my Florida feet not being used to the weather that was then covering Italy, got frostbitten. I am now in a hospital where I am writing this letter from. " Thank you again for sending me the paper and I would appreciate it very much if you would give my mother the addresses of any other boys from Cocoa who are over here in Italy. As yet I haven’t run across any boys I knew before coming in the Army and would like their addresses if any are in Italy. Sincerely, Pfc. Alta P. Ashurst, Jr. "

        We don’t think any of you fellows have to write to us, Alta Paul, and thank us for the Tribune, but we are most appreciative of the splendid letters we get. We know you fellows have plenty to do without writing to us. What we want to do most is to get the paper to you fellows in the service as regularly as possible.
        Your letter is most interesting and we are sure our readers will get much out of it. Thank for writing, and out best to you.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE April 20, 1944, Page 1)

____________

        Alta Paul Ashurst wins Purple Heart for Wounds

        Another young Cocoa man won the Purple heart medal for wounds received in action. He is Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Ashurst of Cocoa. Information of the medal received by Alta Paul was given us by the young man himself in a letter received the past week from Italy, where he is now in action with the troops chasing the Germans to the north of Italy.
        The letter from the young soldier, written on July 19th, and received by us Friday July 27th was as follows:
        "It has been quite some time since I have written to you, but I am sure you understand my reasons for not being able to do so. Any way, you know that I would have dropped you a few lines if it had been possible.
        "I came through the big push here in Italy in fine condition, although very foot sore from the long marches that are necessary when waging an offensive. I didn’t mind being foot sore from chasing the "Jerries", because it would have been very much worse if "Jerry" had been chasing me. I took that thought into consideration every time I felt like complaining over the long hikes.
        "It was really nice to see so much German equipment and material of every kind and description scattered about. As far as one could see were burned vehicles, tanks and even carriages drawn by horses. Entire batteries of German field pieces were knocked out by our planes and artillery. Being in the Infantry, I could see those silent muzzles pointing skyward and think how much damage they could have done. Many of these field pieces were the famous German "88". It was that kind that wounded Aubrey Condit over here; while he was on a combat mission. At least, it was the kind as far as I could gather from the Tribune, so you see it was not only a field piece, but also a fine anti-aircraft and anti-tank weapon.
        "I have received the Purple Heart medal for a wound of the left hand while in the fighting this past winter. The wound wasn’t very bad and healed within a short time. It was caused by the German "Nebebuerten", or six barrel mortar. This happened around a month before I went to the hospital for trenchfoot. I just received the medal as I was in the hospital when they were presenting them and this is the first chance that I have had to receive it. I rejoined my company just before they went back on the line.
        " The weather here in Italy now is very similar to the weather in Florida. The same kinds of fruits and vegetables are grown here also.
        " Thank you very much for sending the Tribune to me. It is coming in quite regularly, and I certainly enjoy keeping up with the news of my friends at home", he said.

        The Tribune did not know of Alta Paul’s wounds and we are glad to know that he is not seriously hurt, as he said in his letter.
        We know his many friends will read his letter with great interest. Thanks to him for writing us and the best of luck.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE August 3, 1944, page 1)
_____________________

        Alta Paul Ashurst Dies of Wounds Received in France

        The Secretary of War has notified Mr. and Mrs. Alta Paul Ashurst that their only son Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr., has died of wounds received in action with the United States Army in France. Mr. And Mrs. Ashurst received a telegram from the Adjutant General last week notifying them that their son has suffered slight wounds in France on August 26th. The telegram stated his death from the wounds received on the 26th of August came Tuesday, telling of the young soldiers death on August 28th, and brought regret to the hundreds of friends of the family and young man, who gave everything he had to the defense of the ideals of the United States of America.
        Alta Paul graduated from the Cocoa High School in 1942 and in March, 1943, entered the United States Army. In the interim between his graduation and military service, he was employed at the State Theatre. He went overseas about a year ago, since which time he has seen action with the U. S. Army in Italy and more lately in the invasion of Southern France. In Italy he fought with his division from Salerno to Pisa, after which he was sent to a rest home at Rome, Italy. During the action around Cassino he received wounds which put him in the hospital and previous to that he suffered frost bitten feet in the action around Alta Villa. He received the Purple Heart medal for his wounds received at Cassino.
        The death of Alta Paul brings to eight the number of local military personnel who have died in service in the current war.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE October 28, 1944, page 1)
_____________________

        Young World War II Soldier Who Died in Action
        To Get Military Funeral Here Sunday
        Funeral Services To Be held At Graveside At Pinecrest Cemetery at 2:30 O’Clock

        Full military honors will be accorded Pfc. Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr. Sunday at the graveside at Pinecrest Cemetery at 2:30 o’clock, when funeral services for the young soldier, who died in action against the enemy in France August 26, 1944 will be held here. Members of the American Legion Post No. 22, of Cocoa, will have charge of the military funeral at the graveside, following the rites by Rev. C. C. Sellers, pastor of the Rockledge Presbyterian Church.
        The remains of young Ashurst arrived in New York recently aboard the U. S. Army Transport Robert F. Burns, will arrive here Saturday morning when a military guard of honor from the local military Legion Hall will meet the train and escort the body to the Koon-Wylie Funeral Home.
        The body of young Ashurst is the first of the young men of this community who died while in action against the enemy overseas to arrive here to be interred on home soil, near his family he loved so well.
        Young Ashurst, the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Ashurst, of this city, enlisted in the Army March 7, 1942, and was overseas for about a year when he was fatally wounded while in action against the enemy in France. He was 21 years old at the time of his death.
        Members of the American Legion and the Legion Auxiliary, the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the V. F. W. Auxiliary are requested to meet at the Legion Home here Saturday afternoon at 1:30, from which point the members will go in a body to the services.
        Honorary pallbearers named to serve Sunday are Chas. Jenkins, Donald Stradley, Jack and Hugh Parrish, Albert L. McGlaun, Jr., Randolph Pierson, Davis Van Nest, Alex Brown, Howard Brannin, George and Richard Weinberg, James Ponder, John L. Cain, Albert Woodruff, John Fortenberry, and Neal Faulk, who were close friends and school mates of young Ashurst.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE April 22, 1948, Page 8.)

____________

        Memorial Service for Ashurst Sunday P.M. At Presbyterian Church 4 O’clock

        Memorial services for Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr., young son of Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Ashurst, of this city , who was killed in action in Southern France September 16, will be held at the Rockledge Presbyterian Church next Sunday afternoon at 4 o’clock. The memorial service will be conducted by Rev. A.W. Rideout, pastor.
        Ashurst was born in Cocoa and graduated from Cocoa High School. He was a member of the Rockledge Church. He had been overseas for a year when he died in action, and had been awarded the Purple Heart medal for wounds received in Italy.
        All of his friends and the citizens of the community are invited to attend this service to show their deep respect and admiration for one of our fine boys who has paid the full price for victory.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE October 19, 1944 page 1)

___________

        Impressive Memorial Service for Ashurst

        Many At The Memorial Sunday

        A Special Memorial Service in honor of Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr., was held in the Rockledge Presbyterian Church of Rockledge on Sunday afternoon , October 22, 1944. The Rev. Arthur W. Rideout, pastor of the church, officiated and Mrs. Arthur W. Rideout was organist. As part of the service the American Legion Gold Star Citation of Merit was presented to the parents of Alta Paul Asserts, Jr.
        With a background of organ music a memorial candle-lighting service was held, outlining the things for which men gave their lives. The seven-concrete lights for which men will die were each lit in turn, representing Nation, State, Community, School, Home, and Church. The candles were red, representing the cost of life blood which must flow in devotion that these lights may be lit in our lives. Following this the seven abstract lights for which men give their lives were lit. These were the lights of Courage, Purity, Honesty, Stewardship, Faith, Hope and Love. The empowering flame for all these lights was the central light of Jesus Christ, represented by a white candle in the center of the communion table. The white candle used to light each other light in turn represented the devotion to duty, country and church which was Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr. All these lights are lit in our lives only as we give our lives that they may burn more brightly. Among the beautiful flowers adorning the sanctuary was a cross of white upon a background of red roses, given in loving memory of Alta Paul Ashurst by the members of the Rockledge Presbyterian Church.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE October 26, 1944 page 1)

 

 











Pfc. Joe R. Avant

Hometown: Entered service from Brevard County, Florida

U. S. Army

Serial # 34787958

Killed in Action, April 24, 1944

Interment 1 December 1948, Woodlawn National Cemetery, Elmira, New York, Section F, Site 4139

(Source: National WWII Memorial 

 
















Pfc. Thomas N. Baker

Hometown: Entered service from Brevard County, Florida

U. S. Army

Serial # 34244249

896 Port Company

Died of non-battle Wounds, December 19, 1945

Buried Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii,
Plot C, Row 1, Grave 465

(Source: National WWII Memorial 

 

















 

Pvt. Frank M. Bell, Jr.

U. S. Navy

Serial # 1410725

(Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)











 

 




Seaman 1C Carl Eugene Bennett
United States Navy, United States Naval Reserve

Serial # 05560640

Killed in Action Tuesday, February 29, 1944

Memorial Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England

Awarded Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

____________


National WWII Memorial 

World War II Registry of Americans who contributed to the war effort.

Honored by Waldo H. Clark (Citation)

 









 



 

SSG Wilbur Bevil

U. S. Army

Serial # 34023712

Killed in Action

(Source: National Archies Access to Archival Databases (AAD)








 

 



 

 

Pfc. Marvin H. Booth

U. S. Army

Serial # 34023905

12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry division

Killed in Action June 15, 1944

Buried Normandy American Cemetery, Colleville-sur-Mer, France

Awarded Bronze Star, Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

____________________

        Marvin Booth is Now in Old England

        Writing his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Booth, recently, Pfc. Marvin H. Booth, U.S. Army, tells them that he is now somewhere in England. The soldier says that he had seen some pretty scenery in England, but that it was damp and cold, nothing like sunny Florida. He was formerly stationed at Camp Benning , and asks that his Tribune be changed so that it will reach him now in England.
        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE February 24, 1944 page 4)

        _____________

        LOCAL SOLDIER DIES IN ACTION ON FRENCH SOIL
        MARVIN H. BOOTH, 30 SON OF MR. AND MRS. W.E. BOOTH DIED JUNE 15TH
        Family Notified
        Booth is Fourth Local boy to Give Life During the Second World War


        Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Booth, of West Peachtree street, received notification from the Secretary of War late Wednesday that their son Marvin H. Booth, 30, had died on French soil on Thursday, June 15. " The Secretary of War desires me to express his deep regret that your son, Marvin H. Booth, was killed in action on June 15th in France. Letter follows," the telegram, which was signed by the Adjutant General, said.
        The loss of Booth is the fourth young man to give his life in the current struggle, and the first in France. He was born on Merritt Island thirty years ago.
        Booth went into the Army in March 1941, and obtained his training at Camp Blanding and at Ft. Benning, Ga. He was sent overseas in April of this year.
        Surviving him are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Booth; five sisters, Mrs. Ralph Painter, Mrs. Tyson Spears, Mrs. Lester Cox, and Miss. Helen Booth, all of Cocoa, and two brothers, William of Cocoa and Wesley of Savannah, Ga.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE on July 20, 1944 page 1)

        ___________

        Bronze Star Will Be Presented to Family Of Marvin Booth

        Posthumously the Bronze Star will be presented to Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Booth, parents of Pfc. Marvin H. Booth, who died in action in Europe on June 13, 1944, according to a letter received this week from the Adjutant General’s office in Washington, as follows:

        BRONZE STAR MEDAL

        " For heroic Service in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States at ****** 13, June, 1944.
        " The decoration will be forwarded to the commanding General, Fourth Service Command, Atlanta, Ga., who will select an officer to make the presentation. The officer selected will communicate with you concerning your wishes of the matter.
        " May I again express my deepest sympathy to you in your bereavement.

        "J.A. ULIO

        " Major General,

        " The Adjutant General’s Office."


        Pfc. Booth was wounded June 13, 1944 and died June 15, . His parents have been notified that they would also receive the Purple Heart Medal for his wounds while in action against the enemy.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE March 22, 1945 page 6)

        _______________

        Bronze Star to Be Presented Parents of Marvin Booth
        Army Officer to Make Award Tues.

        The award of the Bronze Star Medal to Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Booth, of Cocoa, on behalf of their son, Pfc. Marvin H. Booth, who died on the battlefield of Europe with the American forces June 15, 1944, will be made at ceremonies at the Legion Home on Peachtree street next Tuesday night, March 27th, at 8 o’clock. It was announced today. Preparations for the program are in charge of the local Legion Post. Ray Tooley Commander, and co-officers. A fine representation of members of the Legion Post is requested at the ceremonies Tuesday night by Mr. Tooley.
        Col. Philip L. Cook, Commanding Officer at the Welsh Convalescent Hospital in Daytona Beach, has been designated by the War Department to present the award to Mr. and Mrs. Booth, and will be here for the purpose Tuesday night.
        The award of the Bronze Star to Marvin Booth was made posthumously by Present Roosevelt recently " for heroic service in connection with military operations against the enemy June 13, 1944" Booth was wounded on June 13th and died of his wounds June 15th.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE March 22, 1945 page 3)

        _____________

        Marvin H. Booth Awarded Purple Heart Posthumously


        Mrs. W.E. Booth , mother of Marvin H. Booth 30, who died in action on French soil June 15th, shortly after the invasion of France by the American forces, has received a letter from Secretary of War Henry Stimpson, notifying her that her son had been awarded the Purple Heart Medal for wounds received in battle in defense of his country. Mr. Stimpson’s letter, dated October 31st, and received by Mrs. Booth last week was as follows:

        " THE SECRETARY OF WAR

        " Washington, Oct 31, 1944

        My Dear Mrs. Booth:
        " At the request of the President, I write to inform you that the Purple Heart has been awarded posthumously to you son, Private First Class Marvin H. Booth, Infantry, who sacrificed his life in defense of his country.
        " Little that we can do or say will console you for the death of your loved one. We profoundly appreciate the greatness of your loss, for in a very real sense the loss suffered by any of us in this battle for our country is a loss shared by all of us. When the medal, which you will receive shortly, reaches you, I want you to know that with it goes my sincerest sympathy and the hope that time and victory of our cause will finally lighten the burden of your grief.

        Sincerely yours ,

        " HENRY L. STIMPSON ."

        The Booth family was notified here on July 19th of the death of Marvin, who was the fourth young man from this community to give his life in the present war. He entered the armed forces in March 1941 , and was sent overseas in April 1943.

        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 9, 1944 page 2)






 






 

        Radioman 1C John Alden Bolton
        U. S. Navy
        Serial # 02677878
        Killed in Action Friday, April 6, 1943
        Memorial Manila American Cemetery, Ft. Bonifacio, Manila, Philippines
        Awarded Purple Heart
       
        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)










 

 






Frank H. Borowski

[No information Found]

 
















 

Electrician’s Mate 1C Walter Roderick Butter, Jr.
U. S. Navy, United States Naval Reserve

Serial # 05561529

Killed in Action Sunday, April 22, 1945

Memorial: Honolulu Memorial, Tablet of Missing, Honolulu, Hawaii

Awarded Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

___________

Melbourne Cemetery, Melbourne, Florida

Zone A, Section 18

Born September 7, 1921, Died April 22, 1945

U. S. Government Headstone: In memory of Walter R. Butter, Jr.

Florida, EM1 USNR WW II PH Sept 1921-22 Apr 1945

(Source: The Two Cemeteries at Melbourne, by the South Brevard Genealogical Society)









 

 

 




Pfc. Madison P. Carter

U. S. Army

Serial # 3493466

Died Non-battle Wounds

( Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)















 
SSG Joseph W. Cantrell

U. S. Army

Serial # 34057947

Killed in Action August 4, 1944

Awarded Purple Heart, Combat Infantryman Badge

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

National WWII Memorial
  Picture and Citation

World War II Registry of Americans who contributed to the war effort











 



 

TSG Garret T. Cooper, Jr.

U. S. Army Air Force

Serial # 32571195

1838th Ordinance Company, Aviation

Died of Wounds, December 7, 1944

Buried Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines,

Plot F, Row 15, Grave 57

Awarded Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

__________

        Former Cocoa Boy Sends Regards From New Britain

        Gary Cooper, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Cooper, former resident of the city, writes us from New Britain to give a little news and to send regards to friends in Cocoa. Gary is now a Technical Sergeant in the Army.
        "Just another friendly letter to let you know that one of your former readers of The Tribune still remembers his old haunts and friends in Cocoa.
        "My mother just returned to her home from your city where she had been the guest of my sister for about a month. She wrote me and told me about Cocoa and of the people whom I well remember. From all I can gather my mother had a lovely visit with all her friends and she told me all about the happenings that have taken place. I am sorry to hear of Mr. Provost’s illness and would appreciate it if you would extend my wishes for a speedy recovery. I have always admired him as a real friend and a true admirer of sports.
        "I am somewhere in New Britain, where, I cannot disclose at this time. It has been rough here to say the least but I have been fortunate enough to stay well and healthy thus far. The jungles are the same as you see them printed in the various papers and on the screen of different theaters. All is hustle and bustle with various jobs to accomplish for an all-out Allied victory. The fellows are all striving, seeking, yearning for that one big trip to the good old United States and home to loved ones. In closing I am extending my regards to all my friends in Cocoa, hoping to see you all when this is over", he said.
        Gary is well remembered by many friends in Cocoa who will be glad to read the most interesting letter from him that is printed here. His sister is Mrs. Wilbur M Kimrey of this city, and his mother visited here not too long ago. Many thanks for the splendid letter, Gary. Do it again some time.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE May 25, 1944)

______________

    Gary Cooper Writes From Jungles of New Guinea

    Technical Sergeant Gary T. Cooper, brother of Mrs. Wilbur Kimrey of Cocoa, and who attended the local school when his parents lived in Cocoa several years ago, V-mails us from New Guinea as follows:
    "Just a few lines before the jungle night closes in and blankets us for the next few hours. All is peaceful tonight with a lovely tropical moon to make a fellow dream of home and his loved ones. It sort of reminds me of Florida on a warm summer night.
    "I have moved since you received my last letter. Lots of things have happened during that time. It is my wish to tell you about a few happenings but Uncle Sam says no so that is out of the question at this time. It is very beautiful here in New Guinea, far prettier than any other place I have been while in the jungles. The weather is mild, with a slight rainy spell at times. It gets awfully hot during the day but the nights are comfortable. The plant life is something marvelous with various types of beautiful birds.
    "I have eaten lots of corned beef in the jungles, far more than I ever hoped for. Fresh meats are a rare treat and so are fresh vegetables and fruits. Would you believe it, we actually had a fresh tomato for evening chow not so many nights ago.
    "I am feeling fine and all is shipshape. The torrid sun has given me a dark coat of tan which resembles that of a native. So far I have been lucky not to catch any of those jungle diseases. I sleep under a mosquito net every night and take my daily atabrine to provide against the dreaded malaria.
    "In closing, I want to be remembered to all my friends in Cocoa. I have been searching, hoping to meet someone from Cocoa. I have been unfortunate so far. Best of luck and may we meet again real soon," he wrote on a V-mail page letter
    Gary is remembered here by many people, particularly among the younger folks. He played football for Cocoa High and was well known in Cocoa where his friends will be glad to read his letter and to know that he is getting along all right. Thanks for writing, Gary, and we, too, hope it won’t be long before we can all be together again

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE September 14, 1944, page 4)

______________

        Gary Cooper Is In The Philippines

        Gary Cooper, well known here, writes his sister, Mrs. Wilbur Kimrey, that he is now in the Philippines. Gary states that the weather there is wet and will be until the latter part of January.
        "I have seen quite a lot of the treacherous little yellow devils since landing here. They give us a call with their bombers and strafe once in a while. The most annoying feature is their coming over just to keep us from sleeping at night. My foxhole is very close by so in case of any disturbance on their part, in I go.
        "The Philippine people greeted us all with open arms. They were clothed in rags and had very little to eat. Their homes were destroyed along with their churches and schools. Some of the women were able to save their best dresses for our coming here on the island. About 20 percent of the population can speak English, so we get along very well. The women do our wash and we can hire a man or a boy to do other odd jobs for us about the camp. The rice fields are interesting, especially the way the Filipinos work with water buffalo. I am fine," he wrote.
        The young man has many good friends here and in the service who will read his letter with great interest. Thanks to Mrs. Kimrey for letting us publish it.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE December 21, 1944, page 6)

______________

        Gary Cooper, Jr., Dies in Action At Leyte December 6

        Mrs. Wilbur Kimrey, sister of Sgt. Gary T. Cooper, Jr., received the news that her brother was killed in action at Leyte, Philippine Island, on December 6th. The family had been advised several days ago that Sgt. Cooper had been seriously wounded. Mrs. Kimrey is leaving today for Ridgewood, N. J., to be with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Cooper, who have lived at that address since leaving Cocoa some time ago.
        Young Cooper was well known here by many of our residents, having lived here for several years with his parents when they made their home in Cocoa. He graduated from Cocoa High School in 1937, and later attended Brewton Parker College in Georgia.
        Gary was interested in athletics in Cocoa and played on the team that represented the local school, and was particularly good at baseball. At the time he was called into the Army he was employed in war work in New Jersey. He was connected with the Army Air Forces in the ordinance department.
        Besides his wife and parents, who live in Patterson, N. J., he is survived by a brother, Neil, and his sister, Mrs. Kimrey, of this city.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE February 1, 1945, page 1)

_____________

        Body of Local Boy Re-Interred Near Manila

        The body of one of Cocoa’s heroes of World War II, T/S Gary T. Cooper, Jr., was re-interred recently at McKinley Field, near Manila, Philippine Islands, the parents of the young soldier, Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Cooper, have been notified by the U. S. War Department.
        The young man died at Leyte December 7, 1944, and is one of the twelve young men from this community who died in action during World War II.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE July 21, 1949, page 1)

       








         

         






        Pfc. John A. Davis, Jr.

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34209326

        Died Non-Battle Wounds, April 22, 1944

        Buried Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England,

        Plot F, Row 6, Grave 84

        Awarded Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)





         

       

         

         

        William Shelton Davis
        U. S. Navy

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)

        National WWII Memorial 

        World War II Registry of Americans who contributed to the war effort

             Honored by Richard E. Davis, Son Citation

     






         

         

        Lt. Livio Gerald DeBonis

        U. S. Navy

        Serial # O-106360

        Died July 20, 1944

        Memorial: Tablet of the Missing, East Coast Memorial, New York

        City, USA

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

      



  

         

        

         

         

        Pfc. Limus Duhart

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34404982

        370th Infantry Regiment, 92nd Infantry Division

        Finding of Death, Missing in Action, October 29, 1945

        Memorial: Tablet of Missing at Florence American Cemetery ,

        Via Cassia, Italy

        Awards Bronze Star, Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)










         

        

         

         

        SGT James L. Golightly

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34787971

        Killed in Action

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)








        

        

         

         

        Lt. (jg) Sidney George Goodman

        U. S. Navy, United States Naval Reserve

        Serial # O-104450

        Missing in Action, June 5, 1944

        Memorial: Tablet of the Missing at East Coast Memorial, New York

        City, USA

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

    





   

         

         



        SSG Eugene Goodson

        U. S. Army Air Force

        12th AAF B25 Wing

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)

    



   

        

         

         

     Gunner’s Mate 3C Charles Adrian Harlock

        U. S. Navy

        Killed in Action

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)









        

        

         

         

        TEC5 William Harris, Jr.

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34203367

        3908th Quartermaster Truck Company

        Died Non-Battle, December 26, 1944

        Buried Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold (Moselle), France

        Plot C, Row 14, Grave 36

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

     



   

      

         

         

        Yeoman 2nd Class Charles P. Hawthorne

        Melbourne Cemetery, Melbourne, Florida

        Zone A, Section 27, Funeral Home: Brownlie

        Born: 1918 Died: 1943 Buried: September 7, 1943

        U. S. Government Headstone: Florida: Yeoman 2CL

        USNR 19 Dec1918 – 4 Sept 1943

        (Source: The Two Cemeteries at Melbourne, by The South Brevard Genealogical Society)

     






   

         

        

         

         

        Motor Machinist Mate 2C Samuel Dodd Holmes, Jr.

        U. S. Navy

        Killed in Action April 28, 1944

        Buried Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England,

        Plot E, Row 5, Grave 36

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

        Sam Holmes, Jr., Killed in Action

        Many friends of Sam D. Holmes, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Holmes, of Titusville, will regret to learn that the young man died in action with the U. S. Navy recently. Official notification of his death came from the Navy Department Saturday to his parents in Titusville and his wife, who is living with her parents in Athens, Georgia.

    (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE May 18, 1944, page 1)









     



     

     

    Aviation Machinist’s Mate 3C Dennis Thomas Hughes

    U. S. Navy
Died December 25, 1944

    _____________

        Husband of Local Girl Listed As Missing

        Mrs. T. D. Hughes, Jr., the former Miss Ora Mae Cowart, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cowart received a message Saturday morning from the Navy Department notifying that her husband, an Aviation Machinist’s Mate, 3/c, was missing in action following the crash of a PBY while on flight in the pacific.
        Young Hughes was stationed at the Banana River Naval Air Station for about two years and was well known here. He left the States November 20th for service in the Pacific.
        Mrs. Hughes has been making her home here for some time with her parents, following the transfer of her husband to foreign duty.
        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE Jan 4, 1945, page 1)

        _____________

        Husband Of Local Girl Dies In Action

        Mrs. Ora Mae Hughes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cowart of Cocoa, received official notification Monday of the death of her husband, Dennis Thomas Hughes, Jr., Aviation Machinist’s Mate, who previously had been reported missing in action in the Pacific on December 25, 1944, when the PBM, of which he was a member of the crew, crashed. The confirmation came from the Navy Department.
        Mrs. Hughes, who has been here with her parents since her husband went to service in the Pacific last year, said Tuesday that the memorial services would be held for her husband at the Baptist Church at Heath Springs, S. C., where his parents live. She plans to go to South Carolina for the services. Only his parents and wife survive his death.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE January 18, 1945, Page 1)

        ____________

        Body Of Tommy Hughes Returned For Burial In Home State

        The long trip home for Dennis Thomas Hughes, Jr., Sunday, October 26, when his body was laid to rest in the Salem Cemetery, Heath Springs, near Lancaster, S. C.
        Hughes, the husband of the former Miss Ore Mae Cowart, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cowart of this city, was killed in action in the Pacific December 25, 1944, his body being interred in the Naval cemetery in the Hawaiian Islands. The latter part of October it was brought home on the steamship Honda Knot along with the bodies of other servicemen, who, like him, had made the supreme sacrifice for their country.
        Tommie Hughes was well known here, where he was on duty at the Banana River Naval Air Station, during which service he met and married Miss Ora Mae Cowart. Other survivors are his parents Mr. and Mrs. D. T. Thomas, of Pleasant Hill, S. C.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 6, 1947)













 




 

1LT Guy Jones

Serial # 01042847

U. S. Army

Killed in Action

(Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)





 





 

 

 

 

Pfc. Jesse H. Keith

U. S. Army

Serial # 6928379

Died Non-Battle

(Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)















 

 

Lt. John Milton Kleinman

Died in Airplane Crash, November 1944,

Melbourne Naval Air Station, Melbourne, Florida

___________

        Lt. John Kleinman Dies in Accident

        Many friends here will learn with regret of the death of Lt. John Kleinman, 23, the son of Mrs. Jessie Kleinman, of Titusville, who died Friday in the crash of his airplane at the Melbourne Naval Air Station.
        Kleinman was one of the speakers at the recent bond rally staged in Central Park in this city, and was the first speaker on the program.
        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 24, 1944 page 1)














 

 

SGT Ernest B. Lay

U. S. Army

486th Bomber Squadron, 340th Bomber Group, Medium

Missing, Died November 5, 1944

Memorial: Tablet of the Missing at Florence American Cemetery, Florence, Italy

Awarded Air Medal, Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

__________

        Sgt. E. B. Lay Is Now Located In S. Carolina

        Sgt. Ernest B. (Bubs) Lay , son of Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Lay of Cocoa, sends us a change of address for his Tribune. Sgt. Lay in now located at Greenville, S. C., where his address is 470th Bomb Sqd., 334th Bomb Gp., Greenville Army Air Base, Greenville, S. C.
        "My apologies for not sending my new address in the past. I enjoy the paper very much and always look forward to it. I appreciate your kindness in the past for sending the paper. Cocoa is a place I will never forget," said Sgt. Lay in his letter.
        Thanks for those kind words, Bubs.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE April 20, 1944, Page 6)

        ______________

        Sgt. E. B. Lay Is Now An Engineer-Gunner on Plane

        At a 12th AAF B-25 Base, Sgt. B. Lay, 24, of Cocoa, Florida, has been assigned to a combat-seasoned medium bombardment group, it is announced from headquarters of the twelfth air force in Italy.
        Now serving as an engineer-gunner in a B25 Mitchell group in the Mediterranean theatre, he went overseas in August, 1944. He enlisted in the army in November 1941.
        Sgt. Lay is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene E. Lay, of Cocoa, Florida.
        The Allied landings in southern France were supported by bombers, from Sergeant Lays Mitchell group. After beginning its combat career in Tunisia with close support missions for the British Eighth Army, this group, cited by the President as a distinguished unit, helped drive the enemy out of Sicily and up northern Italy.
        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE October 19, 1944, page 7)

        ___________

        Sgt. Ernest B. Lay Listed As Missing In Action, Italy

        Mrs. James B. Weinberg was notified Sunday, Nov. 26, that her brother, Sgt. Ernest B. (Bubs) Lay, U. S. Army Air Force, has been missing in action over Italy since November 5th. The telegram said any subsequent information about the young Army Sergeant would be communicated to the family as soon as possible.
        Hopes that Sgt. Lay, who was a member of a crew of a B25, and his fellow crew members are still alive, and will show up soon, has been expressed here. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Lay, of this city.
        Ernest, better known to his friends and intimates as "Bubs", volunteered for the Army service November 12, 1941, and was sent overseas in August of the current year, after training as an engineer-gunner on a B25 bomber. He arrived overseas in Corsica in September, and has been in action with his air force since that time from that area.
        Popular with his friends here, young Lay is a graduate of Cocoa High School, and well known.
        The Tribune joins with the many friends of the family in expressing the hope that he and his buddies will be found and in good health.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 30, 1944, Page 1)

        ______________

        War Department Announces Death Of Sgt. Ernest B. Lay

        The Adjutant General’s Office in Washington has informed Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Lay, of this city, that their son, Sgt. Ernest B. Lay, U. S. Army Air Corps, who last November was listed as missing in action, is now officially listed as having died in action in the Mediterranean area November 6, 1944.
        The confirmation came to Mrs. James Weinberg, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Lay and brother [sister?] of the young soldier Friday, November 9th.
        Sgt. Lay volunteered his service November 12, 1941, and after completing training in this country was sent overseas in August, 1944, as a gunner in a B25. The letter from the Adjutant General’s office stated that the B25 crew of which young Lay was a member took off about 10:20 A. M. on November 25, 1944, while on route with a formation to bomb Padua in northeastern Italy. The ship entered the islands of Elba and Capraia over the Tyrrhenian sea and was never seen or heard again. No parachutes were observed by the remainder of the squadron and subsequent searches revealed no trace of the plane or its crew members.
        Young Lay becomes the twelfth local young man who died in the services of the country in World War Two. He was a graduate of the local school in 1936, and later attended Stetson University. He is survived by his mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Lay, and two sisters, Mrs. James Weinberg and Mrs. Howard Osteen, all of this city.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 15, 1945, Page 1)












 

 

1 LT Carll B. MacDowell

U. S. Army

Serial # O-342799

506 Parachute Infantry Regt, 101st Airborne Division

Killed in Action

Buried Luxembourg American Cemetery, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg, Plot I, Row 6, Grave 3

Awarded Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)












 

 

Aviation Machinist’s Mate 2C Frank G. Malounek, Jr.

U. S. Navy

Serial # 5519944

Missing in Action, February 27, 1945

Memorial: Tablets of the Missing at Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England

Awarded Air Medal with Gold Star, Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

 












 

 

Pfc. Joseph W. Mathers, Jr.

U. S. Army

Serial # 34975075

422nd Infantry Regiment, 106th Infantry Division

Died of Wounds, Prisoner of War, January 31, 1945

Buried at Netherlands American Cemetery, Margaten, Netherlands, Plot N, Row 5, Grave 16

Awarded Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)








 



 

 

Gunner’s Mate 3C Henry Cecil Newbern

U. S. Navy

Died of Wounds December 6, 1944

(Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)


______________

        NEWBERN COMES HOME AFTER PACIFIC SERVICE

        H.C. Newbern, Gunner’s Mate, 3/c U.S.N. , left Sunday for San Francisco, following a week’s visit here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Newbern. The young man came to see us Friday and told us that he had seen 17 months service in the South Pacific in the Transport service as a member of the gunnery crew. H.C. said that his ship was bombed three times by the japs. As a souvenir of the was front in the South Pacific he brought his mother a Jap flag, which he obtained in the Admiralty Islands. While here he thanked us for sending him the paper, which he said was slow in catching up with him because of his being aboard ship.

        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE June 22, 1944 page 7)

        _______________

        Two Listed As Killed In Action During Past Week

        Official confirmation of the death of two Cocoa men in action one in the Navy in the Pacific and one in the Army in Germany, was made to relatives here during the past week.
        Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Newbern were advised Saturday by the Navy Department that their son Henry Cecil Newbern , Jr., who was 21 years of age on November 24th, 1944, had been killed in action in action in the Pacific, while Mrs. Lula Wittfeld, wife of Walter Wittfeld of Merritt Island, received a letter Monday from Mrs. Archie Regal Wittfeld, who is living with her relatives at Lawtey, stating that she had received a telegram from the War Department on January 12th notifying her of the death of her husband, Sgt. Archie R. Wittfeld, in Germany, on December 21, 1944.
        Young Newbern was born in Atkinson County, Ga., November 21, 1923, but made his home in Cocoa for six years preceding his enlistment in the Navy on his birthday in 1942. He was a Gunner’s Mate, third class, in the U.S. Navy at the time of his death. Writing his mother in his last letter young Newbern said: "I really know now what war is." He was describing " D " day for the Philippine invasion in the early stages. He had had seventeen months of service in the Pacific. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Newbern, two sisters, Doris and Marjorie, and a young broth , Thomas.
        Wittfeld entered the Army in March , 1943, and was sent overseas with the American forces last year. He was thirty years of age. Before entering the Army, Wittfeld made his home here for five years. His mother Mrs. H.C. Wittfeld, is making her home on Merritt Island with her son Walter, and his family. Sgt. Wittfeld was a cousin of Carl Wittfeld who was taken prisoner by the Japanese at the fall of the Philippines in 1942.

        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE January 18, 1945 page 1)

        _____________

        Memorial Services For Henry Newbern, Jr.
        Sunday At 4:00 P.M.

        Memorial services for Henry C. Newbern, Jr., 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Newbern, of this city, who died in action with the United States Navy in the Pacific in December, will be held at the Baptist Church, Sunday afternoon, February 18th , at 4:00o’clock.
        The memorial service will be in charge of Chaplain J.A. McMurray, of the Banana River Naval Air Station.

        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE February 15, 1945 page 1)

        ___________

        Henry Newbern Is Awarded Purple Heart Posthumously

        Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Newbern, of Cocoa, have received from the Secretary of the Navy, James Forrestal, a Purple Heart Medal, together with a certificate, signed by the Secretary of the Navy, and Randall Jacobs, Vice Admiral of the United States Navy, Chief of Naval Personal, awarded posthumously to their son , Henry C. Newbern, Jr., Gunner’s Mate third class, United States Naval Reserve, who died on December 6, 1944, of wounds received in action in the Pacific.
        The Purple Heart award and certificate was awarded posthumously to Newbern
        For Military Merit and for wounds received in action, resulting in his death December 6, 1944," the certificate stated.
        The certificate was dated March 28, 1945.

        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE May 1, 1945 page 1 )

        _______________

        Bronze Star Medal Post-Humously to H.C. Newbern, Jr.

        Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Newbern have received the award of the Bronze Star Medal on behalf of their son, Henry C. Newbern, Jr., who died in December while in action with the Navy in the Philippine Islands area. The award came from the Secretary of the Navy Forrestal and was for heroism in line of duty. The certificate has been framed by the parents of young Newbern.

        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE August 16, 1945 page 1)
        









 





 

Lt. (jg) Kenneth T. Neyer

U. S. Navy

Serial # O-347668

Missing in Action July 25, 1946

Memorial: Tablet of the Missing in Action, Honolulu, Hawaii

Awarded Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

 







 



 

1 LT Call M. Norwood

U. S. Army Air Force

Serial # O-438440

Died Non-Battle June 1942

(Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)


______________
        Titusville Mourns First Officer’s death In War
        Lt. Norwood Dies in Crash

        Titusville and Brevard County mourns the death of the first officer from the county in the current war. Lt. Call M. Norwood of Titusville, an officer in the U. S. Army Air Corps, died instantly Sunday afternoon when the pursuit plane which he was flying crashed from an altitude of 1,500 feet and burned in a wooded field a short distance from Key Field, Miss., where he was stationed.
        Born at Titusville in 1915, Lt. Norwood attended the local school of that city, and completed two years at Stetson university in 1934.
        He was married June 5th to Miss Lillian Juanita Jones, of Deland, the marriage having been performed in the First Baptist Church at Maridian, Miss. The couple had made their home at Maridian.
        Young Norwood was well known in Cocoa, where he at one time was a member of the Cocoa baseball team in the Old Central Florida semi-pro league.
        In Titusville he was one of the outstanding athletes of the Titusville High School.
        Funeral Services were held at Titusville Wednesday afternoon at 4 o’clock, attended by hundreds of friends of the family from all over the county. Survivors are his widow, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Call M. Norwood, Sr., of Titusville. He was a grandson of the late W. S. Norwood, pioneer citizen of the county

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE July 2, 1942, page 1)











        

 

 

Aviation Metalsmith 3C William Gordon Paterson

U. S. Navy

Serial # 02688416

Lost at Sea February 4, 1944

Memorial: East Coast Memorial, New York City, USA

Awarded Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

___________
       
        Navy Announces Wm. G. Paterson, II., As Lost at Sea in February,’43

        The Secretary of the Navy, Hon. Frank Knox, has notified the parents of Wm. Gordon Paterson, II, Mr. and Mrs. John L. Paterson, that their son has definitely been given up as lost at sea as a result of the torpedoing of the ship on which he was serving, in February, 1943, [listed elsewhere as 1944] in the North Atlantic. The news was transmitted by letter to the young man’s mother at Mt. Dora, Florida., where she is employed by the Faulk & Coleman road contracting firm, and who notified the Tribune Tuesday.
        Mr. Paterson is now in South America, where he has been employed for some time.
        Wm. G. Paterson was born in Cocoa, where he reared and attended school, graduating with the senior class of Cocoa High in 1941, and began his service. He had made the rate of Aviation Machinist’s Mate third class, at the time of his death while in action with the Navy. Young Paterson had been based at Greenland for eight months before his ship was torpedoed, and during Christmas holidays of 1942 had visited his relatives here.
        The letter to the young Navy man’s family from the Secretary of the Navy said that despite the fact that other ships were in the vicinity when Paterson’s ship was torpedoed, and long search was made for survivors, no trace of him was found and because of the frigidness of the waters in the vicinity it must be taken that he was one of those who must be given up.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE February24, 1944 page 1)
     














 



SGT. Edward Peacock

U. S. Army

Serial Number: 34408187

Listed in Service Personnel Not Recovered Following WWII

(See Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo/wwii/)

Date of Loss: 02/09/1945


















 

 

Private Derrell W. Peacock

U. S. Army

Serial # 34244472

114 Engineer Combat Battalion, 32nd Infantry Division

Killed in Action, April 6, 1944

Buried at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines,

Plot A, Row 9, Grave 136

Awarded Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

___________

        Private Derrell Peacock Reported Killed in Action

        Friends of the family have reported to the Cocoa tribune that Private Derrell Peacock of Titusville has been killed in action in New Guinea on April 6th. The information was contained in the message to his relatives from the war Department. His wife lives in Titusville while his father lives on Merritt Island. Derrell was well known here where he was a commercial fisherman.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE May 18, 1944)
  










    





 

 

Sergeant Edward W. Peckenpaugh

U. S. Marine Corps

Serial # 369276

Killed in Action August 1, 1944

Buried at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii,

Plot F, Row 0, Grave 90

Awarded Purple Heart with Gold Star

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

        ____________

        It Is Now Sergeant Edward Peckenpaugh, U. S. M. C.

        Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Peckenpaugh received a letter from their son, Edward Peckenpaugh, who has seen plenty of service in the Southwest Pacific as a member of the U. S. Marine Corps., stating that he is now a Sergeant. Congratulations, and best wishes, Sergeant.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE February 24, 1944, Page 1)

        _____________

        Edward Peckenpaugh Listed As Killed In Action By Navy Department

        The Navy Department notified Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Peckenpaugh yesterday that their son, Edward W. Peckenpaugh, U. S. Marine Corps., had been killed in action in the Pacific. No details were given.
        Sgt. Peckenpaugh had been in the Marine Corps for three years, and saw action in the Pacific at Guadalcanal, was wounded at Tarawa, and also was in other action of the Marines in the Pacific for the Allies during the past few months.
        Before entering the service Peckenpaugh was an actor, and was rising in his chosen profession. He was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Peckenpaugh, who live on Sweet street in Rockledge.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE August 31, 1944, Page 1)

        ______________

        Edward Peckenpaugh’s Last Letter To Parents

        Edward W. Peckenpaugh, reported killed in the Pacific while in action with the U. S. Marine Corps, wrote to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Peckenpaugh, of Sweet street, Cocoa, to "keep their respective fingers crossed – the luck still holds good" in the last letter received by them from their son.
        Friday, July 21
        "Dear Mother and Dad: I imagine this will be one note you will get first glimpse of Dad, if Mom is on her vacation as per schedule. I hope you got my last Saipan V-mail to reassure you on that score. There’s still some more work to be done in the neighborhood, however, and I’m not at all sure if I can get this off to you before the next phase begins. If we have to wait until after the next operation, I’ll merely attach a P. S., that all was well and send this off. I can’t afford to let even one of these efforts to go to waste.
        "I thought I might be able to give you a very few details of the Saipan operation, but it looks as though I’ll have to refer you to the radio and newspapers again. You’ll get the drift of things sooner and more clearly that way.
        "It seems that for the past few months everything I have written has been in the same sketchy vein – but, Dad, the scuttlebutt is getting pretty cheerful about the old men out here after the next phase.
        "So keep your respective fingers crossed – the luck still holds good.
        "All my love to the two dearest people in the world. – Son"
        St Peckenpaugh volunteered for service in the U. S. Marine Corps in 1941, and on January 21, 1942, left for San Diego, California, where he was in training until May 15 of that year, when he was shipped with his division to the South pacific. He saw action at Guadalcanal, Bouganville, Tarawa, where he was wounded and hospitalized for a number of weeks, afterward joining his division for the invasion of Saipan and it is thought at Tinian, between Saipan and Guam.
        He went through the invasion of Saipan in splendid shape, and it is not known where he died in action.
        The U. S. Marine Corps advised Mr. and Mrs. Peckenpaugh by telegram on September 30 of the reported death in action of their son, stating that burial of the young marine was in a military cemetery, and that details would be given later.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE September 7, 1944, page 1)












 

 

Private Charles W. Pettis

U. S. Army

Serial # 14057796

Missing in Action, December 15, 1944

Memorial: Tablets of the Missing, Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission

National WWII Memorial 
World War II Registry of Americans who contributed to the war effort

        Honored by Carl J. Wittfeld, Hometown Friend: Citation

        __________

        Charles Pettis, Carl Wittfeld Write From Jap Prison Camp

        Mrs. Minnie Webb and Mr. Carl Wittfeld have received cards from their sons, Charles Pettis, and Carl Wittfeld, who are prisoners of the Japanese. Mrs. Webb’s card arrived this week from the Philippine Prison Camp No. 4, with no date and said:
        "Dear Mother: Received your letter and package. Was glad to hear the news and really did like the box, but next time send more food like raisins, concentrated soups, cocoa, and candy, dry milk, spices and shirt and pants. R. I. sounds OK and I sure would like to hear from you. All my love"
        The card was typed but signed in Charles handwriting in ink. At the top of the card Charles signified he was in good health by checking a column for that purpose.
        Mr. Wittfeld told us that he had received a card from his son from Philippine Prison camp No. 1, but that card was dated may 1944. He said it was the first card that he had received that bore a date. Me. Wittfeld reported that Carl sent his regards, that he was in good health and that he would like to hear from all his friends.
        These two boys, together with Charles Seawright, were taken prisoner by the Japanese in May, 1942, at the fall of the Philippines.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNEJanuary 18, 1945, Page 5)

        __________

        Charles Pettis Dies on Japanese Prison Ship

        The Tribune was told just as we went to press this morning by Mrs. J. J. Scott that she had received a letter from Minnie Webb, mother of Chas. Pettis, who wrote that she had received a telegram from the War Department notifying her of the death of her son, Chas. Pettis, in December while on a Japanese prison ship while being removed from the Philippine Islands to Japan. It is presumed that young Pettis was on the same ship which another young man, Chas. K. Seawright, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Seawright, died in December while being taken to Japan by a Jap prison ship, and whose family was notified here last week of his death.
        Pettis, Seawright, and Carl Wittfeld, son of Mr. Carl Wittfeld, of Merritt Island, were captured by the Japanese at the fall of Corrigidor in 1942. Wittfeld was also removed to a prison camp in Japan, but his father has heard from him by card.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE August 2, 1945, Page 1)








      

         

         

        Private Mort J. Potter

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34364406

        464th Anti-Aircraft Arty (Automatic Weapons) Battalion

        Died Non-Battle June 9, 1944

        Buried at Honolulu memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii,

        Plot P, Row 0, Grave 553

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

       









         

    

    

        SSG Robert E. Prahl

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34052685

        2nd Infantry Regiment, 5th Infantry Division

        Killed in Action September 15, 1944

        Buried at Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France

        Awarded Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

         









         

        

         

         

     SSG William C. Rumbley

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34007124

        Died June 30, 1944

        Buried at Normandy American Cemetery,

        Colleville-sur-Mer, France

        Awarded Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

         










         

        

         

         

        Private Charles K. Seawright

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 14057793

        Died Prisoner of War December 15, 1944

        Memorial: Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines

        Awarded Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

        ______________

      National WWII Memorial 
        World War II Registry of Americans who contributed to the war effort

       Honoed by Carl J. Wittfeld, Jr., Hometown friend 

        ___________

        Chas. Seawright Broadcasts from Japanese Camp

        Mrs. Fannie Seawright , mother of Chas. K. Seawright, one of three Cocoa boys held in a Japanese prison camp in the Philippines, received a telegram last week from the Provost Marshall General which stated that a short wave broadcast from her son had been heard in this country. The message was relayed here by telegram Saturday , the telegram stated.
        " Following shortwave broadcast from Japan has been intercepted; " Dear Folks: I am Well. Please don’t worry about ****. We had a nice Christmas and hope you did. Take care of yourselves and tell everyone hello for me. Signed Chas. K. Seawright."
        The telegram said that this broadcast supplemented previous official report
        Received from International Red Cross. The telegram was signed Gullion, Provost Marshall General.
        Seawright , together with Chas. Pettis, son of Mrs. Minnie Webb, of Cocoa and Mr. Cal Wittfeld of Merritt Island, were taken prisoners of war by the Japanese at the fall of the Philippine Islands in May, 1942.
        All have written their parents here, the messages having arrived on regular form cards issued by the Japanese, but signed in the handwriting of the young men.

        ( Published by the COCOA TRIBUNE February 17, 1944 page 4.)










       

         



         

        SGT Harold T. Shave

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34052641

        Killed in Action

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)

        Melbourne Cemetery, Melbourne, Florida

        Zone A, Section 14

        Born July 15, 1918, Died July 10, 1944, Buried July 22, 1948

        U. S. Government Headstone: Florida: St 22 Inf Div WW II

        American Legion marker

        Christian Symbol

        (Source: The Two Cemeteries at Melbourne, by The South Brevard Genealogical Society)










         

        

         

         

        TSGT Harvey C. Singleton

        U. S. Army

        Died April 22, 1944

        Buried Saint Augustine National Cemetery, 104 Marine Street,

        St. Augustine, Florida

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)










         
         

        

         

        Charles Elmer Smith

        Melbourne Cemetery, Melbourne, Florida

        Zone A, Section 22

        Born January 15, 1916, Died October 7, 1943, Buried (Blank)

        "In Loving Memory Of Charles Elmer Smith

        15 Jan 1916

        Departed This Life On Wake Island 7 Oct 1943"

        (Source: The Two Cemeteries at Melbourne, by The South Brevard Genealogical Society)

       







 

        

         

         

        Aviation Machinist’s Mate 2C Thomas Royal Smith
        U. S. Navy
        Died Non-Battle November 17, 1943

        __________

        Memorial Service For Tommy Smith Held Wednesday

        Memorial services for Thomas Royal Smith, 21, United States Navy, were held at the First Baptist Church in this city Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock. The memorial was conducted by the Rev. James A. Sawyer, pastor of the church.
        Young Smith died in the crash of a Navy PBY flying boat in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday November 17th. Search for the survivors of the large flying boat continued for several days following the crash, with seven or eight being listed as missing, among them the local man. Hope of finding any survivors was given up Saturday.
        The Commandant of the Naval Air Station at Corpus Christi, to which young Smith had been attached for many months, has written to Mr. and Mrs. Smith, parents of the young man, expressing the regrets of the Navy over his untimely death, and stating the high regard in which the son was held by his mates at Corpus Christi.
        Thomas was born in Vienna, Ga., August 25, 1922, but had spent the greater part of his life here in Cocoa. He attended the local school, and on March 28, 1941, enlisted in the U. S. Navy, in which he was forging ahead. At the time of his death he held the rating of Aviation Machinist’s Mate, second class, and was taking instruction as an enlisted Naval pilot. His death saddened many friends here.
        Surviving him are his parents Mr. and Mrs. R. V. Smith, four sisters, Misses Sarah Lu, Annelle, Charlotte, and Mrs. Frances Wilson, of Cocoa, two brothers, Quinton, of Charleston, S. C., and R. V. Smith, jr., U. S. N. R. at Norfolk, V.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 25, 1943)

       











         

         

        Coxswain Lloyd H. Sommerschield

        U. S. Navy Reserve

        Serial # 05516192

        Missing in Action October 2, 1945

        Memorial: Fort Bonifacio, Manila, Philippines

        Awarded Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

     











   

        

         

         

        Corporal Edmund Clay Stephens

        U. S. Army

        Died Non-Battle November 16, 1943

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)

        ____________

        Corporal Stephens One of Sixteen to Perish In Accident

        Corporal Clay Stephens, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Stephens, of Cocoa, was killed Tuesday when an Army plane in which he was an occupant crashed in a routine training flight at F. Myers, where he had been stationed for several weeks. Seven other Army men died in the plane accident. Stephens entered the Army in November 1942.
        The body will be taken to Orlando today for funeral services and interment.
        Clay was well known here where he lived for many years. Before entering the service he was employed by the Suwannee Life Ins. Co., in Cocoa, later going to Orlando, where he was employed for several years before entering the Army.
        The young soldier made quite a record for himself in training, and was pronounced the honor man in his class at Seymour Johnson Field, N. C., where he took aircraft mechanics in the Army Air Force Technical School. Following his graduation there he was sent to California for further training, going to Ft. Myers several weeks ago, where he had since been serving in the Army. His death is the first known to a local boy since the war started. Many friends extend their sympathies to his wife and parents.
        Surviving his death are his widow, Mrs. Claudia Stephens, of Orlando, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Stephens, of this city, two brothers Hualpha Stephens, of Wichita, Kansas, and Robert Stephens, of Union, Ky., and a sister, Mrs. Alma Dickerson, of Florence, Ky.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 18, 1943, Page 1)

        ____________

        Citation of Honor On Death of E. Clay Stephens

        General H. H. Arnold, Commanding General Army Air Forces, has sent to the family of Edmund Clay Stephens, who died November 16th, 1943, at Ft. Myers when the large bomber of which he was a member of the crew crashed, a "Citation of Honor" signed by the general in his own handwriting. The scroll has been framed by Mrs. W. H. Stephens, mother of Clay, who is keeping it at her home. Clay was the first known service personnel from this community to die during this war., his death being followed the next day by that of Tommy Smith, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. V. Smith, who died when his plane was lost in the Gulf of Mexico, near Corpus Christi, Texas. The wording of the scroll which General Arnold sent the family of Sgt. Stephens reads as follows:

        Citation of Honor
        United States of America
        Corporal Edmund Clay Stephens
        Who gave his life in the performance of duty
        November 16, 1943

        He lived to bear his country’s arms. He died to save its honor. He was a soldier … and he knew a soldiers duty. His sacrifice will help keep aglow the flaming torch that lights our lives … That millions yet unborn may know the priceless joy of liberty. And we pay him homage, and revere his memory, in solemn pride rededicate ourselves to complete fulfillment of the task for which he so valiantly has placed his life upon the altar of man’s freedom.
        (signed) H. H. Arnold
        General U. S. Army
        Commanding General Army Air Forces

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 30, 1944, page 6)

        ____________

        In Memory of Clay Stephens

        The following memorial has been submitted to us in memory of H. Clay Stephens, who died in a plane accident at Ft. Myers on November 16, 1943. We gladly publish the item in memory of Clay.

        Precious Memories
        How they linger – memories of
        Clay Stephens, who gave his life
        on November 16, 1943
      
 "Ones who miss him.
 "Claudia Stephens and Mary K. Stephens"

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 30, 1944, Page 6)














       

         

         

        John Thomas

        Melbourne Cemetery, Melbourne, Florida

        Zone A, Section 23

        Born March 6, 1924, Died March 16, 1943, Buried (Blank)

        "In Loving memory Of Our Son John Thomas, 6 Mar 1924"

        "Lost His Life in Action At Sea 16 Mar 1943"

        (Source: The Two Cemeteries at Melbourne, by The South Brevard Genealogical Society)

     









  

         

         

        LT Charles J. Vinson

        U. S. Navy

        Serial # O-104801

        Died April 23, 1945

        Memorial: Tablet of the Missing, Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)










       




         

         

        Private Wesley J. Watts

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34057956

        119th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division

        Killed in Action July 13, 1944

        Buried Normandy American Cemetery,

        Colleville-sur-Mer, France, Plot I, Row 19, Grave 33

        Awarded Silver Star, Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

        __________

        Relative of Local People Died In Action On Soil Of France

        Private Wesley J. Watts, son of Mrs. P.C. Watts of Cocoa, was killed in action in France July 13th, according to information received here. Watts was inducted into the Army on October 13, 1941, and was stationed in the United States until January of this year when he was sent overseas for active duty. He was twenty–four years of age. Watts was a native of Georgia but had lived in Cocoa and different sections of Florida for a number of years.
        Surviving him are his wife, who lives in Jacksonville; his mother, Mrs. P.C. Watts, of Cocoa; five sisters, Mrs. W.C. White, Mrs. Fred E. Crews of Cocoa, Mrs. G.W. Rigdon of Umatilla, Mrs. William Golden of Thomasville, Ga., and Mrs. W.F. Cochran, Boston, Ga., and three brothers, W.P. Watts and Clyde C. Watts of Cocoa, and O.L. Watts of Thomasville, Ga.

        (Published by the COCOA TRIBUNE August 31, 1944 page 1)













      

         



         

        Pfc. Norris H. Weeks

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 7000934

        Died of Wounds

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)

     

      







  









        A. J. Williams

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34024912

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)

      

       















Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   
World War II

World War II Casualties from Brevard County

These servicemen were either from Brevard County

or had family connections in Brevard County

We have been very liberal in our definition of a Brevard County veteran. Generally, we have listed all the names inscribed on the Memorial Wall, all the names we found listed on official U. S. Government web sites as residents of Brevard County, all those with a hometown located in the county, and all those whose obituary could be found in the local newspapers.



Sources

National WWII Memorial, Washington, D.C.


American Battle Monument Commission

National Archives Access to Archival Dadabases (AAD)



Other Brevard County Casualties

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Cold War

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Alger, M. P., Jr.
Allerton, Dennis R.
Ashurst, Alta P. Jr.
Avant, Joe R.
Baker, Thomas N.
Bell, Frank, Jr.
Bennett, Carl E.
Bevil, Wilbur
Booth, Marvin H.
Bolton, John Alden
Borowski, Frank H.
Butter, Walter R., Jr.
Carter, Madison P.
Cantrell, Joseph W.
Cooper, Gary T., Jr.
Davis, John A., Jr.
Davis, William  Shelton
DeBonis, Livio G.
Duhart, Limus
Golightly, James L.
Goodman, Sidney G.
Goodson, Eugene
Harlock, Charles
Harris, William, Jr.
Hawthorn, Charles
Hecht, Ronald R.*
Holmes, Sam D., Jr.
Hughes, Dennis T.
Jones, Guy
Keith, Jesse H.
Kleinman, John
Lay, Ernest B.
MacDowell, Carll B.
Malounek, Frank, Jr.
Mathers, Joseph W., Jr.
Newbern, Henry C.
Neyers, Kenneth T.
Norwood, Call M.
Osterreicher, T. C.*
Paterson, William Gordon
Peacock, Edward
Peacock, Derrell W.
Peckenpaugh, Edward W., Jr.
Pettis, Charles W.
Potter, Mort J.
Prahl, Robert E.
Ramage, Eugene*
Rumbley, Clyde
Seawright, Charles K.
Seymore, Erwin*
Shave, Harold T.
Singleton, Harvey
Smith, C. Elmer
Smith, Thomas Royal
Sommerchield, Lloyd H.
Stephens, Clay
Thomas, John
Vinson, Charles J.
Watts, Wesley J.
Weeks, Norris H.
Wilkinson, Thomas T.*
Williams, A. J.
Williams, Charles LeRoy*


* Listed on Memorial Wall at Brevard Community College in Cocoa, Florida but no military service information found.


 




 

2nd Lt.Maurice Plaisted Alger, Jr.
Hometown: Troy, New York
Brevard County Connection: UNKNOWN
U. S. Army
Serial: # O-438962
Service: 654th Tank Destroyer Battalion
Died Friday, July 21, 1944
Buried at Normandy American Cemetery,
Colleville-sur-Mer, France, Plot J, Row 16, Grave 4
Awarded Purple Heart
(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

____________

National WWII Memorial 
Honored By Barbara Alger Olgeirson, Sister
Honored By Ann E. Alger Melbourne, Sister
Honored by Ann M. Gaule, Niece

____________

        2nd Lt. M.P. AlGER, JR., DIES IN ACTION

        A letter from Mr. M. P. Alger, Sr., Oak Forge, New York, and Georgiana, Florida., this week gives the sad intelligence of the death of his son, 2nd Lt. M.P. Alger, Jr. on the battlefield of France on July 21st. Lt. Alger was connected with the 654th Tank Drs Bn. Lt. Alger and his mother and father considered Cocoa and Merritt Island their home since his family came from the Philippine Islands, where his father, Capt. M.P. Alger served with the Philippine Constabulary. His name appears on the Cocoa Honor Roll. Lt. Alger was born at Cebu, Philippine Island, in 1920, but graduated from Manilus School, Manilus, N.Y. He held a commission in the Reserve Corps of the Army, and entered the service in March 1942, with the 654th T.D. Bn. at Camp Gordon, Ga., until he went overseas in September 1943. Lt. Alger spent his last leave with his parents in Cocoa last September, but did not have the opportunity to complete the visit as he was called back to duty to leave for overseas duty.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE August 10, 1944, page 4)

 










 
Pfc. Dennis Richard Allerton

Hometown: Entered service from Florida

Brevard County Connection:

U. S. Army

Serial # 34531488

153 Infantry Regiment, 38the Infantry Division

Died Tuesday February 13, 1945

Buried Manila American Cemetery, Ft. Bonifacio, Manila, Philippines, Plot D., Row 10, Grave 19.

Awarded the Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

 

 



 

 

Pfc. Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr.

Hometown: Cocoa, Brevard County, Florida

U. S. Army
Serial # 34547141
Died of wounds, August 28, 1944
Awarded Purple Heart
_____________

National WWII Memorial 

Honored by Albert L. McGlaun, Friend (Citation)

Honored by Dr. R. M. Barber, Cousin (Citation)

__________________

        Alta Paul Ashurst gives account of fighting in Italy which he has seen

        The Tribune is appreciative of the letter which we received from Pfc. Alta Paul Ashurst Saturday from Italy, where the young soldier has been in the thick of things since he landed there. Despite the fact that the letter is cut by censors, it is most interesting, as out readers will find.
        Alta Paul did his training at Camp Jackson, S. C., and was there for a short time before he went overseas to get in the thick of the fighting. His letter is the first received from any of our military personnel in Italy giving a description of incidents of their lives while on the front. We print it here:

        "My dear Mr. Pound and Mrs. Holderman: You must think that I am very ungrateful for not writing to you sooner and thanking you for sending me The Tribune. I don’t blame you at all if you feel that way, but I also want you to know that I appreciate the paper very much. When we fall in for a few *** and have mail call, I nearly run over my buddies when the mail clerk holds up the paper with a *** around it and yells "Ashurst". I know that my Tribune has arrived.
        As my mother has probably told you I have been with the *** division for quite a number of months. They are quite a fine bunch of fellows and the larger portion of them hail from the state of ***. The division was originally the *** , the insignia being a *** in the center of ***. They are an easy going bunch of boys, but their pet hate seems to be the "Jerries", or, better known as the Germans in the states. We also have quite a few *** in the division that now live in Texas. The "Jerries" hold a mortal fear of them. They are quite expert with their large ***.
        The censor lets us tell whether we were in the fighting at *** or not now. I was there and all around there for quite a while. It was pretty tough there at times with hand to hand fighting being the main thing on the program. The bayonet and grenade being the main weapons. I was glad that back in training they made us do bayonet drill for more than an hour every day, rain or shine. We used to moan about it, but now we thank out lucky stars. It was in *** that we found out that the modern infantry soldier still finds the chance to use the bayonet. We beat the Germans in close fighting, as far as I could see, and at times they didn’t give us a fight at all – they just dropped their rifles and raised their hands, the majority of them being Polish and Czech. It was here that another boy and myself were lying behind some large boulders and, glancing up, saw a group of seven Germans coming around a bend in the road not fifty yards away. We were placed there to help some other boys take some prisoners back to Battalion C. P., so thinking that it was the group of prisoners coming down the road, we raised up and started toward them. Then, we saw that they were armed. A million thoughts raced through my mind and I could see the golden gates opening. For a few seconds we just stood facing each other. They then started forward on both sides of the road . We noticed that there was a machine gunner on the right side of the road and that it was useless to try to fight it out against such odds. We each had *** or better known as the *** . It fires a clip ***. They got up to us and to our surprise they started taking their cartridge belts, gas mask, and their paraphernalia off. They had come in to surrender, much to our relief. We could hardly believe it. The Germans were not over sixteen, the oldest boy being almost twenty. There were two Germans, the other five being Polish. They seemed glad to be going to a prisoner camp, but still believed that Hitler would win. On being questioned, one Polish boy could not be made to believe that the Fifth Army had made another landing below *** . They just laughed when they were told that. "Before we left them they told us that they had something to give us for not harming them. Each of them pulled out of their pack pockets a rifle cleaning kit, complete with wire brushes, oil and chain. It is in a metal case, a little larger than a tobacco can. The nazi swastika is on it with the German black eagle stamped around it. I am very proud of this kit and if the good Lord is willing I’ll drop in and show it to you when I get home.
        " A few days later, my Florida feet not being used to the weather that was then covering Italy, got frostbitten. I am now in a hospital where I am writing this letter from. " Thank you again for sending me the paper and I would appreciate it very much if you would give my mother the addresses of any other boys from Cocoa who are over here in Italy. As yet I haven’t run across any boys I knew before coming in the Army and would like their addresses if any are in Italy. Sincerely, Pfc. Alta P. Ashurst, Jr. "

        We don’t think any of you fellows have to write to us, Alta Paul, and thank us for the Tribune, but we are most appreciative of the splendid letters we get. We know you fellows have plenty to do without writing to us. What we want to do most is to get the paper to you fellows in the service as regularly as possible.
        Your letter is most interesting and we are sure our readers will get much out of it. Thank for writing, and out best to you.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE April 20, 1944, Page 1)

____________

        Alta Paul Ashurst wins Purple Heart for Wounds

        Another young Cocoa man won the Purple heart medal for wounds received in action. He is Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Ashurst of Cocoa. Information of the medal received by Alta Paul was given us by the young man himself in a letter received the past week from Italy, where he is now in action with the troops chasing the Germans to the north of Italy.
        The letter from the young soldier, written on July 19th, and received by us Friday July 27th was as follows:
        "It has been quite some time since I have written to you, but I am sure you understand my reasons for not being able to do so. Any way, you know that I would have dropped you a few lines if it had been possible.
        "I came through the big push here in Italy in fine condition, although very foot sore from the long marches that are necessary when waging an offensive. I didn’t mind being foot sore from chasing the "Jerries", because it would have been very much worse if "Jerry" had been chasing me. I took that thought into consideration every time I felt like complaining over the long hikes.
        "It was really nice to see so much German equipment and material of every kind and description scattered about. As far as one could see were burned vehicles, tanks and even carriages drawn by horses. Entire batteries of German field pieces were knocked out by our planes and artillery. Being in the Infantry, I could see those silent muzzles pointing skyward and think how much damage they could have done. Many of these field pieces were the famous German "88". It was that kind that wounded Aubrey Condit over here; while he was on a combat mission. At least, it was the kind as far as I could gather from the Tribune, so you see it was not only a field piece, but also a fine anti-aircraft and anti-tank weapon.
        "I have received the Purple Heart medal for a wound of the left hand while in the fighting this past winter. The wound wasn’t very bad and healed within a short time. It was caused by the German "Nebebuerten", or six barrel mortar. This happened around a month before I went to the hospital for trenchfoot. I just received the medal as I was in the hospital when they were presenting them and this is the first chance that I have had to receive it. I rejoined my company just before they went back on the line.
        " The weather here in Italy now is very similar to the weather in Florida. The same kinds of fruits and vegetables are grown here also.
        " Thank you very much for sending the Tribune to me. It is coming in quite regularly, and I certainly enjoy keeping up with the news of my friends at home", he said.

        The Tribune did not know of Alta Paul’s wounds and we are glad to know that he is not seriously hurt, as he said in his letter.
        We know his many friends will read his letter with great interest. Thanks to him for writing us and the best of luck.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE August 3, 1944, page 1)
_____________________

        Alta Paul Ashurst Dies of Wounds Received in France

        The Secretary of War has notified Mr. and Mrs. Alta Paul Ashurst that their only son Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr., has died of wounds received in action with the United States Army in France. Mr. And Mrs. Ashurst received a telegram from the Adjutant General last week notifying them that their son has suffered slight wounds in France on August 26th. The telegram stated his death from the wounds received on the 26th of August came Tuesday, telling of the young soldiers death on August 28th, and brought regret to the hundreds of friends of the family and young man, who gave everything he had to the defense of the ideals of the United States of America.
        Alta Paul graduated from the Cocoa High School in 1942 and in March, 1943, entered the United States Army. In the interim between his graduation and military service, he was employed at the State Theatre. He went overseas about a year ago, since which time he has seen action with the U. S. Army in Italy and more lately in the invasion of Southern France. In Italy he fought with his division from Salerno to Pisa, after which he was sent to a rest home at Rome, Italy. During the action around Cassino he received wounds which put him in the hospital and previous to that he suffered frost bitten feet in the action around Alta Villa. He received the Purple Heart medal for his wounds received at Cassino.
        The death of Alta Paul brings to eight the number of local military personnel who have died in service in the current war.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE October 28, 1944, page 1)
_____________________

        Young World War II Soldier Who Died in Action
        To Get Military Funeral Here Sunday
        Funeral Services To Be held At Graveside At Pinecrest Cemetery at 2:30 O’Clock

        Full military honors will be accorded Pfc. Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr. Sunday at the graveside at Pinecrest Cemetery at 2:30 o’clock, when funeral services for the young soldier, who died in action against the enemy in France August 26, 1944 will be held here. Members of the American Legion Post No. 22, of Cocoa, will have charge of the military funeral at the graveside, following the rites by Rev. C. C. Sellers, pastor of the Rockledge Presbyterian Church.
        The remains of young Ashurst arrived in New York recently aboard the U. S. Army Transport Robert F. Burns, will arrive here Saturday morning when a military guard of honor from the local military Legion Hall will meet the train and escort the body to the Koon-Wylie Funeral Home.
        The body of young Ashurst is the first of the young men of this community who died while in action against the enemy overseas to arrive here to be interred on home soil, near his family he loved so well.
        Young Ashurst, the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Ashurst, of this city, enlisted in the Army March 7, 1942, and was overseas for about a year when he was fatally wounded while in action against the enemy in France. He was 21 years old at the time of his death.
        Members of the American Legion and the Legion Auxiliary, the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the V. F. W. Auxiliary are requested to meet at the Legion Home here Saturday afternoon at 1:30, from which point the members will go in a body to the services.
        Honorary pallbearers named to serve Sunday are Chas. Jenkins, Donald Stradley, Jack and Hugh Parrish, Albert L. McGlaun, Jr., Randolph Pierson, Davis Van Nest, Alex Brown, Howard Brannin, George and Richard Weinberg, James Ponder, John L. Cain, Albert Woodruff, John Fortenberry, and Neal Faulk, who were close friends and school mates of young Ashurst.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE April 22, 1948, Page 8.)

____________

        Memorial Service for Ashurst Sunday P.M. At Presbyterian Church 4 O’clock

        Memorial services for Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr., young son of Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Ashurst, of this city , who was killed in action in Southern France September 16, will be held at the Rockledge Presbyterian Church next Sunday afternoon at 4 o’clock. The memorial service will be conducted by Rev. A.W. Rideout, pastor.
        Ashurst was born in Cocoa and graduated from Cocoa High School. He was a member of the Rockledge Church. He had been overseas for a year when he died in action, and had been awarded the Purple Heart medal for wounds received in Italy.
        All of his friends and the citizens of the community are invited to attend this service to show their deep respect and admiration for one of our fine boys who has paid the full price for victory.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE October 19, 1944 page 1)

___________

        Impressive Memorial Service for Ashurst

        Many At The Memorial Sunday

        A Special Memorial Service in honor of Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr., was held in the Rockledge Presbyterian Church of Rockledge on Sunday afternoon , October 22, 1944. The Rev. Arthur W. Rideout, pastor of the church, officiated and Mrs. Arthur W. Rideout was organist. As part of the service the American Legion Gold Star Citation of Merit was presented to the parents of Alta Paul Asserts, Jr.
        With a background of organ music a memorial candle-lighting service was held, outlining the things for which men gave their lives. The seven-concrete lights for which men will die were each lit in turn, representing Nation, State, Community, School, Home, and Church. The candles were red, representing the cost of life blood which must flow in devotion that these lights may be lit in our lives. Following this the seven abstract lights for which men give their lives were lit. These were the lights of Courage, Purity, Honesty, Stewardship, Faith, Hope and Love. The empowering flame for all these lights was the central light of Jesus Christ, represented by a white candle in the center of the communion table. The white candle used to light each other light in turn represented the devotion to duty, country and church which was Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr. All these lights are lit in our lives only as we give our lives that they may burn more brightly. Among the beautiful flowers adorning the sanctuary was a cross of white upon a background of red roses, given in loving memory of Alta Paul Ashurst by the members of the Rockledge Presbyterian Church.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE October 26, 1944 page 1)

 

 











Pfc. Joe R. Avant

Hometown: Entered service from Brevard County, Florida

U. S. Army

Serial # 34787958

Killed in Action, April 24, 1944

Interment 1 December 1948, Woodlawn National Cemetery, Elmira, New York, Section F, Site 4139

(Source: National WWII Memorial 

 
















Pfc. Thomas N. Baker

Hometown: Entered service from Brevard County, Florida

U. S. Army

Serial # 34244249

896 Port Company

Died of non-battle Wounds, December 19, 1945

Buried Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii,
Plot C, Row 1, Grave 465

(Source: National WWII Memorial 

 

















 

Pvt. Frank M. Bell, Jr.

U. S. Navy

Serial # 1410725

(Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)











 

 




Seaman 1C Carl Eugene Bennett
United States Navy, United States Naval Reserve

Serial # 05560640

Killed in Action Tuesday, February 29, 1944

Memorial Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England

Awarded Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

____________


National WWII Memorial 

World War II Registry of Americans who contributed to the war effort.

Honored by Waldo H. Clark (Citation)

 









 



 

SSG Wilbur Bevil

U. S. Army

Serial # 34023712

Killed in Action

(Source: National Archies Access to Archival Databases (AAD)








 

 



 

 

Pfc. Marvin H. Booth

U. S. Army

Serial # 34023905

12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry division

Killed in Action June 15, 1944

Buried Normandy American Cemetery, Colleville-sur-Mer, France

Awarded Bronze Star, Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

____________________

        Marvin Booth is Now in Old England

        Writing his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Booth, recently, Pfc. Marvin H. Booth, U.S. Army, tells them that he is now somewhere in England. The soldier says that he had seen some pretty scenery in England, but that it was damp and cold, nothing like sunny Florida. He was formerly stationed at Camp Benning , and asks that his Tribune be changed so that it will reach him now in England.
        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE February 24, 1944 page 4)

        _____________

        LOCAL SOLDIER DIES IN ACTION ON FRENCH SOIL
        MARVIN H. BOOTH, 30 SON OF MR. AND MRS. W.E. BOOTH DIED JUNE 15TH
        Family Notified
        Booth is Fourth Local boy to Give Life During the Second World War


        Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Booth, of West Peachtree street, received notification from the Secretary of War late Wednesday that their son Marvin H. Booth, 30, had died on French soil on Thursday, June 15. " The Secretary of War desires me to express his deep regret that your son, Marvin H. Booth, was killed in action on June 15th in France. Letter follows," the telegram, which was signed by the Adjutant General, said.
        The loss of Booth is the fourth young man to give his life in the current struggle, and the first in France. He was born on Merritt Island thirty years ago.
        Booth went into the Army in March 1941, and obtained his training at Camp Blanding and at Ft. Benning, Ga. He was sent overseas in April of this year.
        Surviving him are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Booth; five sisters, Mrs. Ralph Painter, Mrs. Tyson Spears, Mrs. Lester Cox, and Miss. Helen Booth, all of Cocoa, and two brothers, William of Cocoa and Wesley of Savannah, Ga.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE on July 20, 1944 page 1)

        ___________

        Bronze Star Will Be Presented to Family Of Marvin Booth

        Posthumously the Bronze Star will be presented to Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Booth, parents of Pfc. Marvin H. Booth, who died in action in Europe on June 13, 1944, according to a letter received this week from the Adjutant General’s office in Washington, as follows:

        BRONZE STAR MEDAL

        " For heroic Service in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States at ****** 13, June, 1944.
        " The decoration will be forwarded to the commanding General, Fourth Service Command, Atlanta, Ga., who will select an officer to make the presentation. The officer selected will communicate with you concerning your wishes of the matter.
        " May I again express my deepest sympathy to you in your bereavement.

        "J.A. ULIO

        " Major General,

        " The Adjutant General’s Office."


        Pfc. Booth was wounded June 13, 1944 and died June 15, . His parents have been notified that they would also receive the Purple Heart Medal for his wounds while in action against the enemy.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE March 22, 1945 page 6)

        _______________

        Bronze Star to Be Presented Parents of Marvin Booth
        Army Officer to Make Award Tues.

        The award of the Bronze Star Medal to Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Booth, of Cocoa, on behalf of their son, Pfc. Marvin H. Booth, who died on the battlefield of Europe with the American forces June 15, 1944, will be made at ceremonies at the Legion Home on Peachtree street next Tuesday night, March 27th, at 8 o’clock. It was announced today. Preparations for the program are in charge of the local Legion Post. Ray Tooley Commander, and co-officers. A fine representation of members of the Legion Post is requested at the ceremonies Tuesday night by Mr. Tooley.
        Col. Philip L. Cook, Commanding Officer at the Welsh Convalescent Hospital in Daytona Beach, has been designated by the War Department to present the award to Mr. and Mrs. Booth, and will be here for the purpose Tuesday night.
        The award of the Bronze Star to Marvin Booth was made posthumously by Present Roosevelt recently " for heroic service in connection with military operations against the enemy June 13, 1944" Booth was wounded on June 13th and died of his wounds June 15th.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE March 22, 1945 page 3)

        _____________

        Marvin H. Booth Awarded Purple Heart Posthumously


        Mrs. W.E. Booth , mother of Marvin H. Booth 30, who died in action on French soil June 15th, shortly after the invasion of France by the American forces, has received a letter from Secretary of War Henry Stimpson, notifying her that her son had been awarded the Purple Heart Medal for wounds received in battle in defense of his country. Mr. Stimpson’s letter, dated October 31st, and received by Mrs. Booth last week was as follows:

        " THE SECRETARY OF WAR

        " Washington, Oct 31, 1944

        My Dear Mrs. Booth:
        " At the request of the President, I write to inform you that the Purple Heart has been awarded posthumously to you son, Private First Class Marvin H. Booth, Infantry, who sacrificed his life in defense of his country.
        " Little that we can do or say will console you for the death of your loved one. We profoundly appreciate the greatness of your loss, for in a very real sense the loss suffered by any of us in this battle for our country is a loss shared by all of us. When the medal, which you will receive shortly, reaches you, I want you to know that with it goes my sincerest sympathy and the hope that time and victory of our cause will finally lighten the burden of your grief.

        Sincerely yours ,

        " HENRY L. STIMPSON ."

        The Booth family was notified here on July 19th of the death of Marvin, who was the fourth young man from this community to give his life in the present war. He entered the armed forces in March 1941 , and was sent overseas in April 1943.

        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 9, 1944 page 2)






 






 

        Radioman 1C John Alden Bolton
        U. S. Navy
        Serial # 02677878
        Killed in Action Friday, April 6, 1943
        Memorial Manila American Cemetery, Ft. Bonifacio, Manila, Philippines
        Awarded Purple Heart
       
        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)










 

 






Frank H. Borowski

[No information Found]

 
















 

Electrician’s Mate 1C Walter Roderick Butter, Jr.
U. S. Navy, United States Naval Reserve

Serial # 05561529

Killed in Action Sunday, April 22, 1945

Memorial: Honolulu Memorial, Tablet of Missing, Honolulu, Hawaii

Awarded Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

___________

Melbourne Cemetery, Melbourne, Florida

Zone A, Section 18

Born September 7, 1921, Died April 22, 1945

U. S. Government Headstone: In memory of Walter R. Butter, Jr.

Florida, EM1 USNR WW II PH Sept 1921-22 Apr 1945

(Source: The Two Cemeteries at Melbourne, by the South Brevard Genealogical Society)









 

 

 




Pfc. Madison P. Carter

U. S. Army

Serial # 3493466

Died Non-battle Wounds

( Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)















 
SSG Joseph W. Cantrell

U. S. Army

Serial # 34057947

Killed in Action August 4, 1944

Awarded Purple Heart, Combat Infantryman Badge

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

National WWII Memorial
  Picture and Citation

World War II Registry of Americans who contributed to the war effort











 



 

TSG Garret T. Cooper, Jr.

U. S. Army Air Force

Serial # 32571195

1838th Ordinance Company, Aviation

Died of Wounds, December 7, 1944

Buried Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines,

Plot F, Row 15, Grave 57

Awarded Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

__________

        Former Cocoa Boy Sends Regards From New Britain

        Gary Cooper, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Cooper, former resident of the city, writes us from New Britain to give a little news and to send regards to friends in Cocoa. Gary is now a Technical Sergeant in the Army.
        "Just another friendly letter to let you know that one of your former readers of The Tribune still remembers his old haunts and friends in Cocoa.
        "My mother just returned to her home from your city where she had been the guest of my sister for about a month. She wrote me and told me about Cocoa and of the people whom I well remember. From all I can gather my mother had a lovely visit with all her friends and she told me all about the happenings that have taken place. I am sorry to hear of Mr. Provost’s illness and would appreciate it if you would extend my wishes for a speedy recovery. I have always admired him as a real friend and a true admirer of sports.
        "I am somewhere in New Britain, where, I cannot disclose at this time. It has been rough here to say the least but I have been fortunate enough to stay well and healthy thus far. The jungles are the same as you see them printed in the various papers and on the screen of different theaters. All is hustle and bustle with various jobs to accomplish for an all-out Allied victory. The fellows are all striving, seeking, yearning for that one big trip to the good old United States and home to loved ones. In closing I am extending my regards to all my friends in Cocoa, hoping to see you all when this is over", he said.
        Gary is well remembered by many friends in Cocoa who will be glad to read the most interesting letter from him that is printed here. His sister is Mrs. Wilbur M Kimrey of this city, and his mother visited here not too long ago. Many thanks for the splendid letter, Gary. Do it again some time.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE May 25, 1944)

______________

    Gary Cooper Writes From Jungles of New Guinea

    Technical Sergeant Gary T. Cooper, brother of Mrs. Wilbur Kimrey of Cocoa, and who attended the local school when his parents lived in Cocoa several years ago, V-mails us from New Guinea as follows:
    "Just a few lines before the jungle night closes in and blankets us for the next few hours. All is peaceful tonight with a lovely tropical moon to make a fellow dream of home and his loved ones. It sort of reminds me of Florida on a warm summer night.
    "I have moved since you received my last letter. Lots of things have happened during that time. It is my wish to tell you about a few happenings but Uncle Sam says no so that is out of the question at this time. It is very beautiful here in New Guinea, far prettier than any other place I have been while in the jungles. The weather is mild, with a slight rainy spell at times. It gets awfully hot during the day but the nights are comfortable. The plant life is something marvelous with various types of beautiful birds.
    "I have eaten lots of corned beef in the jungles, far more than I ever hoped for. Fresh meats are a rare treat and so are fresh vegetables and fruits. Would you believe it, we actually had a fresh tomato for evening chow not so many nights ago.
    "I am feeling fine and all is shipshape. The torrid sun has given me a dark coat of tan which resembles that of a native. So far I have been lucky not to catch any of those jungle diseases. I sleep under a mosquito net every night and take my daily atabrine to provide against the dreaded malaria.
    "In closing, I want to be remembered to all my friends in Cocoa. I have been searching, hoping to meet someone from Cocoa. I have been unfortunate so far. Best of luck and may we meet again real soon," he wrote on a V-mail page letter
    Gary is remembered here by many people, particularly among the younger folks. He played football for Cocoa High and was well known in Cocoa where his friends will be glad to read his letter and to know that he is getting along all right. Thanks for writing, Gary, and we, too, hope it won’t be long before we can all be together again

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE September 14, 1944, page 4)

______________

        Gary Cooper Is In The Philippines

        Gary Cooper, well known here, writes his sister, Mrs. Wilbur Kimrey, that he is now in the Philippines. Gary states that the weather there is wet and will be until the latter part of January.
        "I have seen quite a lot of the treacherous little yellow devils since landing here. They give us a call with their bombers and strafe once in a while. The most annoying feature is their coming over just to keep us from sleeping at night. My foxhole is very close by so in case of any disturbance on their part, in I go.
        "The Philippine people greeted us all with open arms. They were clothed in rags and had very little to eat. Their homes were destroyed along with their churches and schools. Some of the women were able to save their best dresses for our coming here on the island. About 20 percent of the population can speak English, so we get along very well. The women do our wash and we can hire a man or a boy to do other odd jobs for us about the camp. The rice fields are interesting, especially the way the Filipinos work with water buffalo. I am fine," he wrote.
        The young man has many good friends here and in the service who will read his letter with great interest. Thanks to Mrs. Kimrey for letting us publish it.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE December 21, 1944, page 6)

______________

        Gary Cooper, Jr., Dies in Action At Leyte December 6

        Mrs. Wilbur Kimrey, sister of Sgt. Gary T. Cooper, Jr., received the news that her brother was killed in action at Leyte, Philippine Island, on December 6th. The family had been advised several days ago that Sgt. Cooper had been seriously wounded. Mrs. Kimrey is leaving today for Ridgewood, N. J., to be with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Cooper, who have lived at that address since leaving Cocoa some time ago.
        Young Cooper was well known here by many of our residents, having lived here for several years with his parents when they made their home in Cocoa. He graduated from Cocoa High School in 1937, and later attended Brewton Parker College in Georgia.
        Gary was interested in athletics in Cocoa and played on the team that represented the local school, and was particularly good at baseball. At the time he was called into the Army he was employed in war work in New Jersey. He was connected with the Army Air Forces in the ordinance department.
        Besides his wife and parents, who live in Patterson, N. J., he is survived by a brother, Neil, and his sister, Mrs. Kimrey, of this city.

(Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE February 1, 1945, page 1)

_____________

        Body of Local Boy Re-Interred Near Manila

        The body of one of Cocoa’s heroes of World War II, T/S Gary T. Cooper, Jr., was re-interred recently at McKinley Field, near Manila, Philippine Islands, the parents of the young soldier, Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Cooper, have been notified by the U. S. War Department.
        The young man died at Leyte December 7, 1944, and is one of the twelve young men from this community who died in action during World War II.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE July 21, 1949, page 1)

       








         

         






        Pfc. John A. Davis, Jr.

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34209326

        Died Non-Battle Wounds, April 22, 1944

        Buried Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England,

        Plot F, Row 6, Grave 84

        Awarded Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)





         

       

         

         

        William Shelton Davis
        U. S. Navy

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)

        National WWII Memorial 

        World War II Registry of Americans who contributed to the war effort

             Honored by Richard E. Davis, Son Citation

     






         

         

        Lt. Livio Gerald DeBonis

        U. S. Navy

        Serial # O-106360

        Died July 20, 1944

        Memorial: Tablet of the Missing, East Coast Memorial, New York

        City, USA

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

      



  

         

        

         

         

        Pfc. Limus Duhart

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34404982

        370th Infantry Regiment, 92nd Infantry Division

        Finding of Death, Missing in Action, October 29, 1945

        Memorial: Tablet of Missing at Florence American Cemetery ,

        Via Cassia, Italy

        Awards Bronze Star, Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)










         

        

         

         

        SGT James L. Golightly

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34787971

        Killed in Action

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)








        

        

         

         

        Lt. (jg) Sidney George Goodman

        U. S. Navy, United States Naval Reserve

        Serial # O-104450

        Missing in Action, June 5, 1944

        Memorial: Tablet of the Missing at East Coast Memorial, New York

        City, USA

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

    





   

         

         



        SSG Eugene Goodson

        U. S. Army Air Force

        12th AAF B25 Wing

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)

    



   

        

         

         

     Gunner’s Mate 3C Charles Adrian Harlock

        U. S. Navy

        Killed in Action

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)









        

        

         

         

        TEC5 William Harris, Jr.

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34203367

        3908th Quartermaster Truck Company

        Died Non-Battle, December 26, 1944

        Buried Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold (Moselle), France

        Plot C, Row 14, Grave 36

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

     



   

      

         

         

        Yeoman 2nd Class Charles P. Hawthorne

        Melbourne Cemetery, Melbourne, Florida

        Zone A, Section 27, Funeral Home: Brownlie

        Born: 1918 Died: 1943 Buried: September 7, 1943

        U. S. Government Headstone: Florida: Yeoman 2CL

        USNR 19 Dec1918 – 4 Sept 1943

        (Source: The Two Cemeteries at Melbourne, by The South Brevard Genealogical Society)

     






   

         

        

         

         

        Motor Machinist Mate 2C Samuel Dodd Holmes, Jr.

        U. S. Navy

        Killed in Action April 28, 1944

        Buried Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England,

        Plot E, Row 5, Grave 36

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

        Sam Holmes, Jr., Killed in Action

        Many friends of Sam D. Holmes, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Holmes, of Titusville, will regret to learn that the young man died in action with the U. S. Navy recently. Official notification of his death came from the Navy Department Saturday to his parents in Titusville and his wife, who is living with her parents in Athens, Georgia.

    (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE May 18, 1944, page 1)









     



     

     

    Aviation Machinist’s Mate 3C Dennis Thomas Hughes

    U. S. Navy
Died December 25, 1944

    _____________

        Husband of Local Girl Listed As Missing

        Mrs. T. D. Hughes, Jr., the former Miss Ora Mae Cowart, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cowart received a message Saturday morning from the Navy Department notifying that her husband, an Aviation Machinist’s Mate, 3/c, was missing in action following the crash of a PBY while on flight in the pacific.
        Young Hughes was stationed at the Banana River Naval Air Station for about two years and was well known here. He left the States November 20th for service in the Pacific.
        Mrs. Hughes has been making her home here for some time with her parents, following the transfer of her husband to foreign duty.
        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE Jan 4, 1945, page 1)

        _____________

        Husband Of Local Girl Dies In Action

        Mrs. Ora Mae Hughes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cowart of Cocoa, received official notification Monday of the death of her husband, Dennis Thomas Hughes, Jr., Aviation Machinist’s Mate, who previously had been reported missing in action in the Pacific on December 25, 1944, when the PBM, of which he was a member of the crew, crashed. The confirmation came from the Navy Department.
        Mrs. Hughes, who has been here with her parents since her husband went to service in the Pacific last year, said Tuesday that the memorial services would be held for her husband at the Baptist Church at Heath Springs, S. C., where his parents live. She plans to go to South Carolina for the services. Only his parents and wife survive his death.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE January 18, 1945, Page 1)

        ____________

        Body Of Tommy Hughes Returned For Burial In Home State

        The long trip home for Dennis Thomas Hughes, Jr., Sunday, October 26, when his body was laid to rest in the Salem Cemetery, Heath Springs, near Lancaster, S. C.
        Hughes, the husband of the former Miss Ore Mae Cowart, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cowart of this city, was killed in action in the Pacific December 25, 1944, his body being interred in the Naval cemetery in the Hawaiian Islands. The latter part of October it was brought home on the steamship Honda Knot along with the bodies of other servicemen, who, like him, had made the supreme sacrifice for their country.
        Tommie Hughes was well known here, where he was on duty at the Banana River Naval Air Station, during which service he met and married Miss Ora Mae Cowart. Other survivors are his parents Mr. and Mrs. D. T. Thomas, of Pleasant Hill, S. C.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 6, 1947)













 




 

1LT Guy Jones

Serial # 01042847

U. S. Army

Killed in Action

(Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)





 





 

 

 

 

Pfc. Jesse H. Keith

U. S. Army

Serial # 6928379

Died Non-Battle

(Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)















 

 

Lt. John Milton Kleinman

Died in Airplane Crash, November 1944,

Melbourne Naval Air Station, Melbourne, Florida

___________

        Lt. John Kleinman Dies in Accident

        Many friends here will learn with regret of the death of Lt. John Kleinman, 23, the son of Mrs. Jessie Kleinman, of Titusville, who died Friday in the crash of his airplane at the Melbourne Naval Air Station.
        Kleinman was one of the speakers at the recent bond rally staged in Central Park in this city, and was the first speaker on the program.
        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 24, 1944 page 1)














 

 

SGT Ernest B. Lay

U. S. Army

486th Bomber Squadron, 340th Bomber Group, Medium

Missing, Died November 5, 1944

Memorial: Tablet of the Missing at Florence American Cemetery, Florence, Italy

Awarded Air Medal, Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

__________

        Sgt. E. B. Lay Is Now Located In S. Carolina

        Sgt. Ernest B. (Bubs) Lay , son of Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Lay of Cocoa, sends us a change of address for his Tribune. Sgt. Lay in now located at Greenville, S. C., where his address is 470th Bomb Sqd., 334th Bomb Gp., Greenville Army Air Base, Greenville, S. C.
        "My apologies for not sending my new address in the past. I enjoy the paper very much and always look forward to it. I appreciate your kindness in the past for sending the paper. Cocoa is a place I will never forget," said Sgt. Lay in his letter.
        Thanks for those kind words, Bubs.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE April 20, 1944, Page 6)

        ______________

        Sgt. E. B. Lay Is Now An Engineer-Gunner on Plane

        At a 12th AAF B-25 Base, Sgt. B. Lay, 24, of Cocoa, Florida, has been assigned to a combat-seasoned medium bombardment group, it is announced from headquarters of the twelfth air force in Italy.
        Now serving as an engineer-gunner in a B25 Mitchell group in the Mediterranean theatre, he went overseas in August, 1944. He enlisted in the army in November 1941.
        Sgt. Lay is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene E. Lay, of Cocoa, Florida.
        The Allied landings in southern France were supported by bombers, from Sergeant Lays Mitchell group. After beginning its combat career in Tunisia with close support missions for the British Eighth Army, this group, cited by the President as a distinguished unit, helped drive the enemy out of Sicily and up northern Italy.
        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE October 19, 1944, page 7)

        ___________

        Sgt. Ernest B. Lay Listed As Missing In Action, Italy

        Mrs. James B. Weinberg was notified Sunday, Nov. 26, that her brother, Sgt. Ernest B. (Bubs) Lay, U. S. Army Air Force, has been missing in action over Italy since November 5th. The telegram said any subsequent information about the young Army Sergeant would be communicated to the family as soon as possible.
        Hopes that Sgt. Lay, who was a member of a crew of a B25, and his fellow crew members are still alive, and will show up soon, has been expressed here. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Lay, of this city.
        Ernest, better known to his friends and intimates as "Bubs", volunteered for the Army service November 12, 1941, and was sent overseas in August of the current year, after training as an engineer-gunner on a B25 bomber. He arrived overseas in Corsica in September, and has been in action with his air force since that time from that area.
        Popular with his friends here, young Lay is a graduate of Cocoa High School, and well known.
        The Tribune joins with the many friends of the family in expressing the hope that he and his buddies will be found and in good health.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 30, 1944, Page 1)

        ______________

        War Department Announces Death Of Sgt. Ernest B. Lay

        The Adjutant General’s Office in Washington has informed Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Lay, of this city, that their son, Sgt. Ernest B. Lay, U. S. Army Air Corps, who last November was listed as missing in action, is now officially listed as having died in action in the Mediterranean area November 6, 1944.
        The confirmation came to Mrs. James Weinberg, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Lay and brother [sister?] of the young soldier Friday, November 9th.
        Sgt. Lay volunteered his service November 12, 1941, and after completing training in this country was sent overseas in August, 1944, as a gunner in a B25. The letter from the Adjutant General’s office stated that the B25 crew of which young Lay was a member took off about 10:20 A. M. on November 25, 1944, while on route with a formation to bomb Padua in northeastern Italy. The ship entered the islands of Elba and Capraia over the Tyrrhenian sea and was never seen or heard again. No parachutes were observed by the remainder of the squadron and subsequent searches revealed no trace of the plane or its crew members.
        Young Lay becomes the twelfth local young man who died in the services of the country in World War Two. He was a graduate of the local school in 1936, and later attended Stetson University. He is survived by his mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Lay, and two sisters, Mrs. James Weinberg and Mrs. Howard Osteen, all of this city.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 15, 1945, Page 1)












 

 

1 LT Carll B. MacDowell

U. S. Army

Serial # O-342799

506 Parachute Infantry Regt, 101st Airborne Division

Killed in Action

Buried Luxembourg American Cemetery, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg, Plot I, Row 6, Grave 3

Awarded Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)












 

 

Aviation Machinist’s Mate 2C Frank G. Malounek, Jr.

U. S. Navy

Serial # 5519944

Missing in Action, February 27, 1945

Memorial: Tablets of the Missing at Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England

Awarded Air Medal with Gold Star, Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

 












 

 

Pfc. Joseph W. Mathers, Jr.

U. S. Army

Serial # 34975075

422nd Infantry Regiment, 106th Infantry Division

Died of Wounds, Prisoner of War, January 31, 1945

Buried at Netherlands American Cemetery, Margaten, Netherlands, Plot N, Row 5, Grave 16

Awarded Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)








 



 

 

Gunner’s Mate 3C Henry Cecil Newbern

U. S. Navy

Died of Wounds December 6, 1944

(Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)


______________

        NEWBERN COMES HOME AFTER PACIFIC SERVICE

        H.C. Newbern, Gunner’s Mate, 3/c U.S.N. , left Sunday for San Francisco, following a week’s visit here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Newbern. The young man came to see us Friday and told us that he had seen 17 months service in the South Pacific in the Transport service as a member of the gunnery crew. H.C. said that his ship was bombed three times by the japs. As a souvenir of the was front in the South Pacific he brought his mother a Jap flag, which he obtained in the Admiralty Islands. While here he thanked us for sending him the paper, which he said was slow in catching up with him because of his being aboard ship.

        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE June 22, 1944 page 7)

        _______________

        Two Listed As Killed In Action During Past Week

        Official confirmation of the death of two Cocoa men in action one in the Navy in the Pacific and one in the Army in Germany, was made to relatives here during the past week.
        Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Newbern were advised Saturday by the Navy Department that their son Henry Cecil Newbern , Jr., who was 21 years of age on November 24th, 1944, had been killed in action in action in the Pacific, while Mrs. Lula Wittfeld, wife of Walter Wittfeld of Merritt Island, received a letter Monday from Mrs. Archie Regal Wittfeld, who is living with her relatives at Lawtey, stating that she had received a telegram from the War Department on January 12th notifying her of the death of her husband, Sgt. Archie R. Wittfeld, in Germany, on December 21, 1944.
        Young Newbern was born in Atkinson County, Ga., November 21, 1923, but made his home in Cocoa for six years preceding his enlistment in the Navy on his birthday in 1942. He was a Gunner’s Mate, third class, in the U.S. Navy at the time of his death. Writing his mother in his last letter young Newbern said: "I really know now what war is." He was describing " D " day for the Philippine invasion in the early stages. He had had seventeen months of service in the Pacific. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Newbern, two sisters, Doris and Marjorie, and a young broth , Thomas.
        Wittfeld entered the Army in March , 1943, and was sent overseas with the American forces last year. He was thirty years of age. Before entering the Army, Wittfeld made his home here for five years. His mother Mrs. H.C. Wittfeld, is making her home on Merritt Island with her son Walter, and his family. Sgt. Wittfeld was a cousin of Carl Wittfeld who was taken prisoner by the Japanese at the fall of the Philippines in 1942.

        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE January 18, 1945 page 1)

        _____________

        Memorial Services For Henry Newbern, Jr.
        Sunday At 4:00 P.M.

        Memorial services for Henry C. Newbern, Jr., 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Newbern, of this city, who died in action with the United States Navy in the Pacific in December, will be held at the Baptist Church, Sunday afternoon, February 18th , at 4:00o’clock.
        The memorial service will be in charge of Chaplain J.A. McMurray, of the Banana River Naval Air Station.

        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE February 15, 1945 page 1)

        ___________

        Henry Newbern Is Awarded Purple Heart Posthumously

        Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Newbern, of Cocoa, have received from the Secretary of the Navy, James Forrestal, a Purple Heart Medal, together with a certificate, signed by the Secretary of the Navy, and Randall Jacobs, Vice Admiral of the United States Navy, Chief of Naval Personal, awarded posthumously to their son , Henry C. Newbern, Jr., Gunner’s Mate third class, United States Naval Reserve, who died on December 6, 1944, of wounds received in action in the Pacific.
        The Purple Heart award and certificate was awarded posthumously to Newbern
        For Military Merit and for wounds received in action, resulting in his death December 6, 1944," the certificate stated.
        The certificate was dated March 28, 1945.

        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE May 1, 1945 page 1 )

        _______________

        Bronze Star Medal Post-Humously to H.C. Newbern, Jr.

        Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Newbern have received the award of the Bronze Star Medal on behalf of their son, Henry C. Newbern, Jr., who died in December while in action with the Navy in the Philippine Islands area. The award came from the Secretary of the Navy Forrestal and was for heroism in line of duty. The certificate has been framed by the parents of young Newbern.

        ( Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE August 16, 1945 page 1)
        









 





 

Lt. (jg) Kenneth T. Neyer

U. S. Navy

Serial # O-347668

Missing in Action July 25, 1946

Memorial: Tablet of the Missing in Action, Honolulu, Hawaii

Awarded Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

 







 



 

1 LT Call M. Norwood

U. S. Army Air Force

Serial # O-438440

Died Non-Battle June 1942

(Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)


______________
        Titusville Mourns First Officer’s death In War
        Lt. Norwood Dies in Crash

        Titusville and Brevard County mourns the death of the first officer from the county in the current war. Lt. Call M. Norwood of Titusville, an officer in the U. S. Army Air Corps, died instantly Sunday afternoon when the pursuit plane which he was flying crashed from an altitude of 1,500 feet and burned in a wooded field a short distance from Key Field, Miss., where he was stationed.
        Born at Titusville in 1915, Lt. Norwood attended the local school of that city, and completed two years at Stetson university in 1934.
        He was married June 5th to Miss Lillian Juanita Jones, of Deland, the marriage having been performed in the First Baptist Church at Maridian, Miss. The couple had made their home at Maridian.
        Young Norwood was well known in Cocoa, where he at one time was a member of the Cocoa baseball team in the Old Central Florida semi-pro league.
        In Titusville he was one of the outstanding athletes of the Titusville High School.
        Funeral Services were held at Titusville Wednesday afternoon at 4 o’clock, attended by hundreds of friends of the family from all over the county. Survivors are his widow, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Call M. Norwood, Sr., of Titusville. He was a grandson of the late W. S. Norwood, pioneer citizen of the county

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE July 2, 1942, page 1)











        

 

 

Aviation Metalsmith 3C William Gordon Paterson

U. S. Navy

Serial # 02688416

Lost at Sea February 4, 1944

Memorial: East Coast Memorial, New York City, USA

Awarded Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

___________
       
        Navy Announces Wm. G. Paterson, II., As Lost at Sea in February,’43

        The Secretary of the Navy, Hon. Frank Knox, has notified the parents of Wm. Gordon Paterson, II, Mr. and Mrs. John L. Paterson, that their son has definitely been given up as lost at sea as a result of the torpedoing of the ship on which he was serving, in February, 1943, [listed elsewhere as 1944] in the North Atlantic. The news was transmitted by letter to the young man’s mother at Mt. Dora, Florida., where she is employed by the Faulk & Coleman road contracting firm, and who notified the Tribune Tuesday.
        Mr. Paterson is now in South America, where he has been employed for some time.
        Wm. G. Paterson was born in Cocoa, where he reared and attended school, graduating with the senior class of Cocoa High in 1941, and began his service. He had made the rate of Aviation Machinist’s Mate third class, at the time of his death while in action with the Navy. Young Paterson had been based at Greenland for eight months before his ship was torpedoed, and during Christmas holidays of 1942 had visited his relatives here.
        The letter to the young Navy man’s family from the Secretary of the Navy said that despite the fact that other ships were in the vicinity when Paterson’s ship was torpedoed, and long search was made for survivors, no trace of him was found and because of the frigidness of the waters in the vicinity it must be taken that he was one of those who must be given up.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE February24, 1944 page 1)
     














 



SGT. Edward Peacock

U. S. Army

Serial Number: 34408187

Listed in Service Personnel Not Recovered Following WWII

(See Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo/wwii/)

Date of Loss: 02/09/1945


















 

 

Private Derrell W. Peacock

U. S. Army

Serial # 34244472

114 Engineer Combat Battalion, 32nd Infantry Division

Killed in Action, April 6, 1944

Buried at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines,

Plot A, Row 9, Grave 136

Awarded Purple Heart

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

___________

        Private Derrell Peacock Reported Killed in Action

        Friends of the family have reported to the Cocoa tribune that Private Derrell Peacock of Titusville has been killed in action in New Guinea on April 6th. The information was contained in the message to his relatives from the war Department. His wife lives in Titusville while his father lives on Merritt Island. Derrell was well known here where he was a commercial fisherman.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE May 18, 1944)
  










    





 

 

Sergeant Edward W. Peckenpaugh

U. S. Marine Corps

Serial # 369276

Killed in Action August 1, 1944

Buried at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii,

Plot F, Row 0, Grave 90

Awarded Purple Heart with Gold Star

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

        ____________

        It Is Now Sergeant Edward Peckenpaugh, U. S. M. C.

        Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Peckenpaugh received a letter from their son, Edward Peckenpaugh, who has seen plenty of service in the Southwest Pacific as a member of the U. S. Marine Corps., stating that he is now a Sergeant. Congratulations, and best wishes, Sergeant.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE February 24, 1944, Page 1)

        _____________

        Edward Peckenpaugh Listed As Killed In Action By Navy Department

        The Navy Department notified Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Peckenpaugh yesterday that their son, Edward W. Peckenpaugh, U. S. Marine Corps., had been killed in action in the Pacific. No details were given.
        Sgt. Peckenpaugh had been in the Marine Corps for three years, and saw action in the Pacific at Guadalcanal, was wounded at Tarawa, and also was in other action of the Marines in the Pacific for the Allies during the past few months.
        Before entering the service Peckenpaugh was an actor, and was rising in his chosen profession. He was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Peckenpaugh, who live on Sweet street in Rockledge.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE August 31, 1944, Page 1)

        ______________

        Edward Peckenpaugh’s Last Letter To Parents

        Edward W. Peckenpaugh, reported killed in the Pacific while in action with the U. S. Marine Corps, wrote to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Peckenpaugh, of Sweet street, Cocoa, to "keep their respective fingers crossed – the luck still holds good" in the last letter received by them from their son.
        Friday, July 21
        "Dear Mother and Dad: I imagine this will be one note you will get first glimpse of Dad, if Mom is on her vacation as per schedule. I hope you got my last Saipan V-mail to reassure you on that score. There’s still some more work to be done in the neighborhood, however, and I’m not at all sure if I can get this off to you before the next phase begins. If we have to wait until after the next operation, I’ll merely attach a P. S., that all was well and send this off. I can’t afford to let even one of these efforts to go to waste.
        "I thought I might be able to give you a very few details of the Saipan operation, but it looks as though I’ll have to refer you to the radio and newspapers again. You’ll get the drift of things sooner and more clearly that way.
        "It seems that for the past few months everything I have written has been in the same sketchy vein – but, Dad, the scuttlebutt is getting pretty cheerful about the old men out here after the next phase.
        "So keep your respective fingers crossed – the luck still holds good.
        "All my love to the two dearest people in the world. – Son"
        St Peckenpaugh volunteered for service in the U. S. Marine Corps in 1941, and on January 21, 1942, left for San Diego, California, where he was in training until May 15 of that year, when he was shipped with his division to the South pacific. He saw action at Guadalcanal, Bouganville, Tarawa, where he was wounded and hospitalized for a number of weeks, afterward joining his division for the invasion of Saipan and it is thought at Tinian, between Saipan and Guam.
        He went through the invasion of Saipan in splendid shape, and it is not known where he died in action.
        The U. S. Marine Corps advised Mr. and Mrs. Peckenpaugh by telegram on September 30 of the reported death in action of their son, stating that burial of the young marine was in a military cemetery, and that details would be given later.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE September 7, 1944, page 1)












 

 

Private Charles W. Pettis

U. S. Army

Serial # 14057796

Missing in Action, December 15, 1944

Memorial: Tablets of the Missing, Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines

(Source: American Battle Monuments Commission

National WWII Memorial 
World War II Registry of Americans who contributed to the war effort

        Honored by Carl J. Wittfeld, Hometown Friend: Citation

        __________

        Charles Pettis, Carl Wittfeld Write From Jap Prison Camp

        Mrs. Minnie Webb and Mr. Carl Wittfeld have received cards from their sons, Charles Pettis, and Carl Wittfeld, who are prisoners of the Japanese. Mrs. Webb’s card arrived this week from the Philippine Prison Camp No. 4, with no date and said:
        "Dear Mother: Received your letter and package. Was glad to hear the news and really did like the box, but next time send more food like raisins, concentrated soups, cocoa, and candy, dry milk, spices and shirt and pants. R. I. sounds OK and I sure would like to hear from you. All my love"
        The card was typed but signed in Charles handwriting in ink. At the top of the card Charles signified he was in good health by checking a column for that purpose.
        Mr. Wittfeld told us that he had received a card from his son from Philippine Prison camp No. 1, but that card was dated may 1944. He said it was the first card that he had received that bore a date. Me. Wittfeld reported that Carl sent his regards, that he was in good health and that he would like to hear from all his friends.
        These two boys, together with Charles Seawright, were taken prisoner by the Japanese in May, 1942, at the fall of the Philippines.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNEJanuary 18, 1945, Page 5)

        __________

        Charles Pettis Dies on Japanese Prison Ship

        The Tribune was told just as we went to press this morning by Mrs. J. J. Scott that she had received a letter from Minnie Webb, mother of Chas. Pettis, who wrote that she had received a telegram from the War Department notifying her of the death of her son, Chas. Pettis, in December while on a Japanese prison ship while being removed from the Philippine Islands to Japan. It is presumed that young Pettis was on the same ship which another young man, Chas. K. Seawright, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Seawright, died in December while being taken to Japan by a Jap prison ship, and whose family was notified here last week of his death.
        Pettis, Seawright, and Carl Wittfeld, son of Mr. Carl Wittfeld, of Merritt Island, were captured by the Japanese at the fall of Corrigidor in 1942. Wittfeld was also removed to a prison camp in Japan, but his father has heard from him by card.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE August 2, 1945, Page 1)








      

         

         

        Private Mort J. Potter

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34364406

        464th Anti-Aircraft Arty (Automatic Weapons) Battalion

        Died Non-Battle June 9, 1944

        Buried at Honolulu memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii,

        Plot P, Row 0, Grave 553

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

       









         

    

    

        SSG Robert E. Prahl

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34052685

        2nd Infantry Regiment, 5th Infantry Division

        Killed in Action September 15, 1944

        Buried at Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France

        Awarded Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

         









         

        

         

         

     SSG William C. Rumbley

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34007124

        Died June 30, 1944

        Buried at Normandy American Cemetery,

        Colleville-sur-Mer, France

        Awarded Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

         










         

        

         

         

        Private Charles K. Seawright

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 14057793

        Died Prisoner of War December 15, 1944

        Memorial: Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines

        Awarded Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

        ______________

      National WWII Memorial 
        World War II Registry of Americans who contributed to the war effort

       Honoed by Carl J. Wittfeld, Jr., Hometown friend 

        ___________

        Chas. Seawright Broadcasts from Japanese Camp

        Mrs. Fannie Seawright , mother of Chas. K. Seawright, one of three Cocoa boys held in a Japanese prison camp in the Philippines, received a telegram last week from the Provost Marshall General which stated that a short wave broadcast from her son had been heard in this country. The message was relayed here by telegram Saturday , the telegram stated.
        " Following shortwave broadcast from Japan has been intercepted; " Dear Folks: I am Well. Please don’t worry about ****. We had a nice Christmas and hope you did. Take care of yourselves and tell everyone hello for me. Signed Chas. K. Seawright."
        The telegram said that this broadcast supplemented previous official report
        Received from International Red Cross. The telegram was signed Gullion, Provost Marshall General.
        Seawright , together with Chas. Pettis, son of Mrs. Minnie Webb, of Cocoa and Mr. Cal Wittfeld of Merritt Island, were taken prisoners of war by the Japanese at the fall of the Philippine Islands in May, 1942.
        All have written their parents here, the messages having arrived on regular form cards issued by the Japanese, but signed in the handwriting of the young men.

        ( Published by the COCOA TRIBUNE February 17, 1944 page 4.)










       

         



         

        SGT Harold T. Shave

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34052641

        Killed in Action

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)

        Melbourne Cemetery, Melbourne, Florida

        Zone A, Section 14

        Born July 15, 1918, Died July 10, 1944, Buried July 22, 1948

        U. S. Government Headstone: Florida: St 22 Inf Div WW II

        American Legion marker

        Christian Symbol

        (Source: The Two Cemeteries at Melbourne, by The South Brevard Genealogical Society)










         

        

         

         

        TSGT Harvey C. Singleton

        U. S. Army

        Died April 22, 1944

        Buried Saint Augustine National Cemetery, 104 Marine Street,

        St. Augustine, Florida

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)










         
         

        

         

        Charles Elmer Smith

        Melbourne Cemetery, Melbourne, Florida

        Zone A, Section 22

        Born January 15, 1916, Died October 7, 1943, Buried (Blank)

        "In Loving Memory Of Charles Elmer Smith

        15 Jan 1916

        Departed This Life On Wake Island 7 Oct 1943"

        (Source: The Two Cemeteries at Melbourne, by The South Brevard Genealogical Society)

       







 

        

         

         

        Aviation Machinist’s Mate 2C Thomas Royal Smith
        U. S. Navy
        Died Non-Battle November 17, 1943

        __________

        Memorial Service For Tommy Smith Held Wednesday

        Memorial services for Thomas Royal Smith, 21, United States Navy, were held at the First Baptist Church in this city Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock. The memorial was conducted by the Rev. James A. Sawyer, pastor of the church.
        Young Smith died in the crash of a Navy PBY flying boat in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday November 17th. Search for the survivors of the large flying boat continued for several days following the crash, with seven or eight being listed as missing, among them the local man. Hope of finding any survivors was given up Saturday.
        The Commandant of the Naval Air Station at Corpus Christi, to which young Smith had been attached for many months, has written to Mr. and Mrs. Smith, parents of the young man, expressing the regrets of the Navy over his untimely death, and stating the high regard in which the son was held by his mates at Corpus Christi.
        Thomas was born in Vienna, Ga., August 25, 1922, but had spent the greater part of his life here in Cocoa. He attended the local school, and on March 28, 1941, enlisted in the U. S. Navy, in which he was forging ahead. At the time of his death he held the rating of Aviation Machinist’s Mate, second class, and was taking instruction as an enlisted Naval pilot. His death saddened many friends here.
        Surviving him are his parents Mr. and Mrs. R. V. Smith, four sisters, Misses Sarah Lu, Annelle, Charlotte, and Mrs. Frances Wilson, of Cocoa, two brothers, Quinton, of Charleston, S. C., and R. V. Smith, jr., U. S. N. R. at Norfolk, V.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 25, 1943)

       











         

         

        Coxswain Lloyd H. Sommerschield

        U. S. Navy Reserve

        Serial # 05516192

        Missing in Action October 2, 1945

        Memorial: Fort Bonifacio, Manila, Philippines

        Awarded Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

     











   

        

         

         

        Corporal Edmund Clay Stephens

        U. S. Army

        Died Non-Battle November 16, 1943

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)

        ____________

        Corporal Stephens One of Sixteen to Perish In Accident

        Corporal Clay Stephens, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Stephens, of Cocoa, was killed Tuesday when an Army plane in which he was an occupant crashed in a routine training flight at F. Myers, where he had been stationed for several weeks. Seven other Army men died in the plane accident. Stephens entered the Army in November 1942.
        The body will be taken to Orlando today for funeral services and interment.
        Clay was well known here where he lived for many years. Before entering the service he was employed by the Suwannee Life Ins. Co., in Cocoa, later going to Orlando, where he was employed for several years before entering the Army.
        The young soldier made quite a record for himself in training, and was pronounced the honor man in his class at Seymour Johnson Field, N. C., where he took aircraft mechanics in the Army Air Force Technical School. Following his graduation there he was sent to California for further training, going to Ft. Myers several weeks ago, where he had since been serving in the Army. His death is the first known to a local boy since the war started. Many friends extend their sympathies to his wife and parents.
        Surviving his death are his widow, Mrs. Claudia Stephens, of Orlando, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Stephens, of this city, two brothers Hualpha Stephens, of Wichita, Kansas, and Robert Stephens, of Union, Ky., and a sister, Mrs. Alma Dickerson, of Florence, Ky.

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 18, 1943, Page 1)

        ____________

        Citation of Honor On Death of E. Clay Stephens

        General H. H. Arnold, Commanding General Army Air Forces, has sent to the family of Edmund Clay Stephens, who died November 16th, 1943, at Ft. Myers when the large bomber of which he was a member of the crew crashed, a "Citation of Honor" signed by the general in his own handwriting. The scroll has been framed by Mrs. W. H. Stephens, mother of Clay, who is keeping it at her home. Clay was the first known service personnel from this community to die during this war., his death being followed the next day by that of Tommy Smith, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. V. Smith, who died when his plane was lost in the Gulf of Mexico, near Corpus Christi, Texas. The wording of the scroll which General Arnold sent the family of Sgt. Stephens reads as follows:

        Citation of Honor
        United States of America
        Corporal Edmund Clay Stephens
        Who gave his life in the performance of duty
        November 16, 1943

        He lived to bear his country’s arms. He died to save its honor. He was a soldier … and he knew a soldiers duty. His sacrifice will help keep aglow the flaming torch that lights our lives … That millions yet unborn may know the priceless joy of liberty. And we pay him homage, and revere his memory, in solemn pride rededicate ourselves to complete fulfillment of the task for which he so valiantly has placed his life upon the altar of man’s freedom.
        (signed) H. H. Arnold
        General U. S. Army
        Commanding General Army Air Forces

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 30, 1944, page 6)

        ____________

        In Memory of Clay Stephens

        The following memorial has been submitted to us in memory of H. Clay Stephens, who died in a plane accident at Ft. Myers on November 16, 1943. We gladly publish the item in memory of Clay.

        Precious Memories
        How they linger – memories of
        Clay Stephens, who gave his life
        on November 16, 1943
      
 "Ones who miss him.
 "Claudia Stephens and Mary K. Stephens"

        (Published in the COCOA TRIBUNE November 30, 1944, Page 6)














       

         

         

        John Thomas

        Melbourne Cemetery, Melbourne, Florida

        Zone A, Section 23

        Born March 6, 1924, Died March 16, 1943, Buried (Blank)

        "In Loving memory Of Our Son John Thomas, 6 Mar 1924"

        "Lost His Life in Action At Sea 16 Mar 1943"

        (Source: The Two Cemeteries at Melbourne, by The South Brevard Genealogical Society)

     









  

         

         

        LT Charles J. Vinson

        U. S. Navy

        Serial # O-104801

        Died April 23, 1945

        Memorial: Tablet of the Missing, Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)










       




         

         

        Private Wesley J. Watts

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34057956

        119th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division

        Killed in Action July 13, 1944

        Buried Normandy American Cemetery,

        Colleville-sur-Mer, France, Plot I, Row 19, Grave 33

        Awarded Silver Star, Purple Heart

        (Source: American Battle Monuments Commission)

        __________

        Relative of Local People Died In Action On Soil Of France

        Private Wesley J. Watts, son of Mrs. P.C. Watts of Cocoa, was killed in action in France July 13th, according to information received here. Watts was inducted into the Army on October 13, 1941, and was stationed in the United States until January of this year when he was sent overseas for active duty. He was twenty–four years of age. Watts was a native of Georgia but had lived in Cocoa and different sections of Florida for a number of years.
        Surviving him are his wife, who lives in Jacksonville; his mother, Mrs. P.C. Watts, of Cocoa; five sisters, Mrs. W.C. White, Mrs. Fred E. Crews of Cocoa, Mrs. G.W. Rigdon of Umatilla, Mrs. William Golden of Thomasville, Ga., and Mrs. W.F. Cochran, Boston, Ga., and three brothers, W.P. Watts and Clyde C. Watts of Cocoa, and O.L. Watts of Thomasville, Ga.

        (Published by the COCOA TRIBUNE August 31, 1944 page 1)













      

         



         

        Pfc. Norris H. Weeks

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 7000934

        Died of Wounds

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)

     

      







  









        A. J. Williams

        U. S. Army

        Serial # 34024912

        (Source: National Archives Access to Archival Databases (AAD)