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The Victory Arch in Macarty Square
New Orleans, Louisiana



Following the end of the Great World War (now known as World War I), the citizens of the Ninth Ward of New Orleans erected a “Victory Arch.” The carved stone arch, reminiscent of the ancient triumphal arches of the Roman Empire (such as the Arch of Titus), was originally located in the center of Macarty Square, bounded by Alvar, N. Rampart, Pauline, and Burgundy Streets. In 1951 it was moved to the edge of the square near Burgundy Street, where it remains today (see map). A larger image of the Victory Arch can be found here.

A 1919 newspaper article tells some of the history of the monument. The article and a transcription are here.
The inscription (see photograph) at the top of the arch says:
         ERECTED A D 1919 BY THE PEOPLE OF THIS THE NINTH
         WARD IN HONOR OF ITS CITIZENS WHO WERE ENLISTED
         IN COMBATIVE SERVICE AND IN MEMORY OF THOSE WHO
         MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE FOR THE TRIUMPH OF
         RIGHT OVER MIGHT IN THE GREAT WORLD WAR
Photographs of plaques and transcriptions
Affixed to the arch are four cast bronze plaques, listing the names of all those who served, headed by those who were killed in action, and those who died while in service, such as from illness. The names are transcribed as they appear on the plaques.
Comprehensive list of all names
There are 1,231 men and one woman from the Ninth Ward named on the Victory Arch. A comprehensive list of all the names is available here.
One Soldier's Story
Each of the service men listed on the Victory Arch has his own story. Here is one.
Learning more about your World War I soldier
A variety of sources can help you learn more about the service of men and women in World War I, including draft registration and service records. Hints on getting started are available here.
World War I Links
Every day, more and more information about the Great War is added to the World Wide Web. Here are a few useful links.
Last updated May 2012.
Comments and suggestions are welcome.
Norm Hellmers

To contact, send email to:
norm_hellmers @ yahoo.com


Copyright 2003-2012 Norman D. Hellmers. All Rights Reserved.