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Peter Dirck Keyser

picture of Keyser
Thanks to Joe Fulginiti for this image

Before the war

He was born on 8 February 1835, to Peter Augustus Keyser and Martha Eyre (11, 12, 49, 52, 54). He was 27 years old when he was enrolled (5, 31 [63 at death in 1897], 48 [62 at death in 1897]). He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (48, 49, 52).

In 1850, he was living in Northern Liberties, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, with his parents (15). He was 15 years old, and had attended school within the last year (15). His father, Peter A Keyser, was a merchant, with 30,000 in real property (15).

He received an AB and AM from Delaware College (49). He studied chemistry, with Dr FA Genth, for two years (49). He published several papers in the American Journal of Sciences (49). He studied in Germany until he returned to the United States in 1858 (49).

In 1860, he was living in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (in the 12th ward) (10). He was 25 years old, had been born in Pennsylvania, and was a merchant (10). He was living with his parents, three siblings, and three servants (10). His father then had $60,000 in real property and $10,000 in personal property (10).

He was living in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, when he was enrolled (5).

He married Sallie E Steiner on 25 February 1858 (11, 12, 49). They had one child: Sallie Steiner Keyser, who was born on 27 March 1861 (11, 12, 49). (She married Louis M French, of Norton, Connecticut (49). They had one child, Mildred Keyser French, born 30 November 1889 (49).)

In June 1861, he was fourth lieutenant of the a Home Guard company from the twelfth ward of Philadelphia (20).

During the war

He was enrolled and mustered into service on 21 September 1861 (1, 3 [20 Sep], 4, 5, 6, 8, 21, 46, 50, 51, 52, 54). He was enrolled for three years, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, by Lieutenant Colonel Reiff (5, 6). He was mustered in as captain, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (5). He served as captain of company C (1).

He resigned on 15 August 1862 (1, 2, 3 [discharged on surgeon's certificate 16 Aug], 4 [resigned], 5 [resigned], 6 [resignation accepted], 8, 49, 50, 51, 52, 54). He resigned because of camp fever and an injury he received at Fair Oaks (49), while serving on General Henry M Naglee's staff, in the Chickahominy campaign (54).

He went to Europe (11). He graduated as a Doctor of Medicine from Jena University in 1864 (11, 31, 49).

On 18 June 1864, he was mustered in, as acting assistant surgeon, US Army (11, 31, 49, 50, 51, 52, 54). He resigned on 9 March 1865 (11, 49, 50, 51, 52, 54). He served as Acting Assistant Surgeon of the US Army from 18 June 1864 through 9 March 1865 (49). He served at the Cuyler Hospital, Germantown (49).

After the war

On 22 November 1864, Dr P D Keyser, of 500 North 4th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, signed the death certificate for Charles Coates (47).

He founded the Philadelphia Eye and Ear Hospital in 1864 (49).

He was a companion and founder of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS), and had national insignia number 3 in MOLLUS, in the Pennsylvania Commandery (7, 18, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54). He went to the Old State House on the morning of 15 April 1865 to hear the news of Lincoln's assassination (13). There he met Brevet Lieutenant Colonel S B Wylie Mitchell, MD, whom he took to Colonel T Ellood Zell's office on 6th Street just about Chestnut (13). In Zell's office, the three friends decided to form a patriotic organization, composed of officers and former officers, which was modeled on the Society of the Cincinnati (formed by officers at the end of the Revolutionary War) (13).

From 1865-1866, he was Chancellor of the Pennsylvania Commandery, Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the US (50, 51, 52).

In 1870, he was ophthalmic surgeon, in the medical department of the Philadelphia German Society (49).

From 1869 through 1873, he was Treasurer of the Pennsylvania Commandery, Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the US (50, 51, 52, 54).

He was associated with the Medico-Chirurgical Hospital both as dean and as professor of opthalmology (31, 49). He was Professor of Ophthalmogy until 1893 (49). He was a consulting surgeon at Wills Eye Hospital, beginning about 1872, and continuing until his death (31, 33, 49).

In 1880, he was living at 1630 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (9). He was 45 years old, had been born in Pennsylvania, and was a physician (9). He was living with his wife Sallie E Kayser (43, born in Pennsylvania, keeping house), and their daughter Sallie S Kayser (19, born in Pennsylvania) (9). Three servants were also living with them (9).

In April 1881, he was part of a committee on reception for the representatives of MOLLUS who attended the Quadrennial Congress of the MOLLUS (37, 50, 52).

In 1883, in ten years at the Wills Eye Hospital, he had seen 5243 patients, and performed 1282 operations (33).

From 5 February 1883 through 1885, he was Junior Vice-Commander of the Pennsylvania Commandery, Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the US (50, 52, 54). On 6 February 1884, he presided at a meeting of the MOLLUS, as Vice-Commander (34).

On 28 October 1884, he read a paper at the ninth annual meeting of the American Academy of Medicine in Baltimore, on the "Relation of medical colleges to preliminary education" (38).

In June 1885, he was appointed to a committee relating to a memorial for Francis Daniel Pastorius (44).

In July 1885, the MOLLUS applied for a charter in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court 2 (27). Keyser was one of the incorporators (27).

In October 1885, he was selected Chancellor-in-Chief of the National Commandery of MOLLUS (29).

He was present at, and probably gave a speech at, the December 1885 meeting of the regiment's Survivor's Association, which was held at Don Wallings' restaurant (Broad and South Penn Square) (19).

In 1886, he attended the annual encampment of the Commandery-in-Chief of the MOLLUS (42).

In January 1888, he attended a reception at the Union League (43).

He was Chancellor-in-Chief of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the US from 1889-1893 (14, 17).

On 1 July 1889, he became a member of the Board of Health of Philadelphia, because of his close friendship with Mayor Fitler (31, 49).

In 1890, he was living at 1832 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (8, 16). He was a physician (16).

In October 1891, he attended an annual meeting of the Commandery-in-Chief of the MOLLUS (40). He was proposed as an officer of the commandery-in-chief (40).

On 22 April 1892, he attended an informal reception at the Penn Club (24).

In April 1895, he attended a reception at the Hotel Bellevue in honor of Professor J Chalmer DaCosta (41).

On October 1895, he was selected as Chancellor-in-Chief of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the US (26).

On 26 February 1896, he spoke at the Alumni Association of Delaware College, in Delaware, on "The Influence of the Dutch on the Education of Delaware" (36).

In March 1896, he offered a resolution at the Philadelphia Board of Health, which was passed, making annual reports private, and establishing a committe to prepare a summary for publiation (35). The Philadelphia Inquirer derided this as censorship (35).

In June 1896, his good friend ex-Mayor Edwin H Fitler died (39). He was an honorary pall-bearer at Fitler's funeral (39).

In October 1896, he attended the annual meeting of the Commandery-in-Chief of MOLLUS and the Pennsylvania Commandery banquet that followed (28, 45).

On 24 October 1896, he attended a political meeting in favor of McKinley, as a vice-president of the Union League (25).

He died at his home, 1832 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, of pleuro-pneumonia, on 8 March 1897 (12, 31 [9 Mar], 32 [9 Mar], 48 [8 Mar], 49 [1 Oct 1908, in Norton, Connecticut], 52 [9 Mar], 54 [9 Mar]). He had a cold on Friday, and died the next Tuesday (54). He was a physician, and was married (48). The funeral was held from his residence, 1832 Arch Street, on 12 March 1897 (30, 32, 48, 54). He was buried "at the old Mennonite Burying Ground in Germantown", Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (30), also known as [?] the Dunkard Ground, in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (48, 49, 54).

Publications

(Based on a search of WorldCat on 4 January 2005. WorldCat also lists several editions of a book co-authored by Elizabeth F Harris and Peter Dirck Keyser, Agents of infectious disease, but does not list the original editions.)

Keyser, Peter Dirck, and Jehu Eyre. Colonel Jehu Eyre: Pennsylvania Artillery, 1776-1781. Philadelphia: Collins, 1880. (Extracted from the Pennsylvania magazine of history and biography, 1879.)

Keyser, Peter Dirck. Glaucoma: its symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. Philadelphia: Lindsy & Blakiston, 1864.

Keyser, Peter Dirck. An instrument for measuring the face and eyes for the proper adjustment of spectacle-frames: also a diagram for recording cases of refraction and accommodation, and for the prescribing of spectacles. [Philadelphia?: 1880s].

Keyser, Peter Dirck. On some forms of inflammatory diseases of the eye: being caused by defects in refraction and accommodation. Philadelphia: Collins, 1877.

Keyser, Peter Dirck. Report on the sewerage system and disposal of sewage matter, etc., of the cities of Berlin, Dresden, Frankfurt-on-the-Main and Paris: made to Hon. Edwin H. Fitler, mayor of the city of Philadelphia. Philadelphia: Dunlap & Clarke, 1890.

Keyser, Peter Dirck. Supplemental report of cataract extractions. Philadelphia: Collins, 1875.

Sources

1 Bates, Samuel Penniman. History of Pennsylvania volunteers, 1861-5. Harrisburg: B. Singerly, state printer, 1869-71. 5 volumes. 'Ninety-first regiment', volume 3, pages 186-233. (In the roster)

2 Official army register

3 regimental descriptive book

4 company C List of commissioned officers (Peter D Keyser)

5 Civil War Veterans' Card File, available at the Pennsylvania State Archives, searched 1 July 2004 (Peter D Keyser)

6 company C, untitled list, probably of status at muster out, entry 2 (Peter D Keyser)

7 Prominent companions of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (searched 31 December 2004) (Peter D Keyser)

8 1890 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, enumeration district 174, page [2] (image 1198 of 2610 on <www.ancestry.com>) (Peter D Keyser)

9 1880 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 9th ward, 8th division, enumeration district 162, page 10B (Peter D Kayser)

10 1860 US census, Pennsylvania, Phialdelphia, 12th ward, page 197, line 4 (Peter D Kayser)

11 Levering History, on WorldConnect, at <www.rootsweb.com>, searched 4 January 2005, citing Col John Levering, Levering Family History, 1897, and the extension by Alice Levering Harker, 1971 (Peter Dirck Keyser)

12 Keyser Family Tree, on WorldConnect, at <www.rootsweb.com>, searched 4 January 2005 (Peter Dirck Keyser)

13 Robert Girard Carroon, The Military Order of the Loyal Legion: 135 years of service to the nation, February 2000, citing a letter by Keyser (Captain Peter Dirk Keyser)

14 Officers of the Commandery-in-Chief 1889-1893 (searched 4 January 2005) (Captain Peter D Keyser)

15 1850 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia County, Northern Liberties, ward 1, handwritten page 52, lines 8-15 (Peter Keyser)

16 1890 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory (Peter D Keyser)

17 'The Loyal Legion'. Washington Post 17 October 1889, page 1 (Peter D Keyser)

18 "Original Companions of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States" (Peter D Keyser)

19 'War Veterans Banqueting'. Philadelphia Inquirer 15 December 1885 page 8 (Peter D Keyser)

20 'The Home Guard organization', Philadelphia Inquirer, 29 June 1861, page 2 (Peter D Keyser)

21 'Camp Chase at Gray's Ferry' Philadelphia Inquirer 19 October 1861 page 8 (Peter D Keyser)

22 'Camp Chase', Philadelphia Inquirer 30 November 1861 (P D Keyser)

23 'Departure of Col. Gregory's regiment', Philadelphia Inquirer 22 January 1862 page 2 (P D Keyser)

24 Gossip of the clubs, Philadelphia Inquirer 23 April 1893 page 15

25 'The war veterans make a big hit', Philadelphia Inquirer 25 October 1896 page [1]

26 'News of interest to the veterans', Philadelphia Inquirer 20 October 1895 page supplement 30

27 'Charter applied for', Philadelphia Inquirer 20 July 1885 page 2

28 'The Loyal Legion in annual session', Philadelphia Inquirer 15 October 1896 page 3

29 'National warriors', Philadelphia Inquirer 22 October 1885 page 3

30 'Dr Keyser buried', Philadelphia Inquirer 13 March 1897 page 3\

31 'Dr. Keyser dead', Philadelphia Inquirer 10 March 1897, page 11

32 [death notice], Philadelphia Inquirer 10 March 1897 page 10 (also published on 11 March 1897 page 5 and 12 March 1897 page 9)

33 'Wills Eye Hospital', Philadelphia Inquirer 24 September 1883 page 2

34 'Loyal legion, Philadelphia Inquirer 7 February 1884 page 3

35 'News censorship', Philadelphia Inquirer 4 March 1896, page 4

36 'News down in Delaware', Philadelphia Inquirer 28 February 1896 page 2

37 'Loyal legion', Philadelphia Inquirer 13 April 1881, page 3

38 'The healing art', Philadelphia Inquirer, 29 October 1884, page 4

39 'Mr. Fitler's funeral', Philadelphia Inquirer, 3 June 1896, page 3

40 'The business meeting', Philadelphia Inquirer, 15 October 1891, page 2

41 'Caught on the fly', Philadelphia Inquirer, 27 April 1895, page 5

42 'Loyal Legion encampment', Philadelphia Inquirer 21 October 1886, page 8

43 'President Benson's reception', Philadelphia Inquirer 3 January 1888, page 2

44 'About town', Philadelphia Inquirer 8 June 1885 page 3

45 'News of interest to the veterans', Philadelphia Inquirer 18 October 1896 page 24

46 'Local intelligence', Philadelphia Inquirer 19 September 1862 page 8 (Peter D Keyser)

47 death certificate, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 22 Nov 1864, Charles Coats (P D Keyser)

48 death certificate, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 8 March 1897, #19232 (Peter D Keyser)

49 'The Founders', from the Bulletin of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, August 1971 (Thanks to Ed McLaughlin for sending a transcription of this to me!) (Peter Dirck Keyser)

50 Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Register of the Commandery of the State of Pennsylvania from April 15 1865 to May 5 1887. Philadelphia, 1887. (Peter Dirck Keyser)

51 Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Register of the Commandery of the State of Pennsylvania. From April 15, 1865, to July 1, 1882. Philadelphia: 1882. (Peter Dirck Keyser)

52 Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Register of the Commandery of the State of Pennsylvania April 15, 1865--September 1, 1902. Philadelphia, 1902. (Peter Dirck Keyser)

53 Register of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Compiled from the Registers and Circulars of the Various Commanderies by J. Harris Aubin. Boston: Published under the Auspices of the Commandery of the State of Massachusetts, 1 January 1906. (Peter D Keyser)

54 'In memoriam: Peter Dirck Keyser', circular 15, series of 1897, whole no. 340, in Memorial circulars, Commandery of Pennsylvania 1880-1899 (Peter Dirck Keyser)

[I have not found him in the 1870 census (checked on Ancestry, 10 January 2005)]

[I did not find him in the Ancestry index to the pension index, by name (10 January 2005)]

Newspaper article

Washington Post 17 October 1889, page 1]
THE LOYAL LEGION.
Ex-President Hayes Re-Elected Commander-in-Chief.

PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 16.--Ex-President R. B. Hayes was to-day unanimously re-elected commander-in-chief of the Loyal Legion. The other officers chosen are as follows: Senior vice commander, Rear Admiral A. Ludlow Case, of New York; junior vice commander, Gen. Nelon A. Miles, California; recorder, Lieut. Col. John P. Nicholson, of Pennsylvania; registrar, Gen. Albert Ordway, District of Columbia; treasurer, Gen. John J. Milhau, of New York; chancellor, Capt. Peter D. Keyser, Pennsylvania; chaplain, H. Clay Trumbull, Pennsylvania; council-in-chief, Gen. Orlando M. Poe, Michigan; councilmen, Maj. John P. Rea, Minnesota, Brevet Maj. Gen. Eugene A. Carr, Missouri; Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace, Indiana; Col. Thomas L. T. Livermore, Massachusetts.

Ex-President Hayes expressed himself as being highly complimented at his re-election to the office of commander-in-chief, and also pleased at the selection the Legion made of the officers to serve with him. The ex-President, although looking very much aged by his recent bereavement, declared himself to be in excellent health. A banquet was tendered the commander-in-chief to-night at the Union League House.

The commandery-in-chief resolved to co-operate with the Pennsylvania commandery in celebrating the twenty-fifth anniversary of the order on April 15, 1890.

St. Louis was selected as the place for holding the next annual meeting.


Gossip of the clubs

Philadelphia Inquirer 23 April 1893 page 15
Gossip of the Clubs
[...]

The Penn Club gave another of those delightfully informal receptions at the room, Eighth and Locust streets, on Tuesday night. The guest was John Drew, and he met several hundred gentlemen prominent in the higher walks of life. The reception was held in one of the rooms on the second floor and the collation served in an adjoining apartment. [...] Among those who greeted Mr. Drew were:

[...] Dr. Peter D. Keyser, [...]


The war veterans make a big hit

Philadelphia Inquirer 25 October 1896 page [1]
THE WAR VETERANS MAKE A BIG HIT
Generals Sickles, Howard and Others Talk for McKinley and Hobart.
RAGGED BATTLE FLAGS
A Dramatic Scene at the Academy of Music That Caused Unparalleled Enthusiasm.

GENERALS SICKLES, HOWARD AND the other veterans who are stumping the country for McKinley and national honor were accorded a great reception at the Academy of Music last night. There was a parade and an over-flow meeting in front of the Union League.

[...]
OFFICERS OF THE MEETING

Upon the stage with the presiding officer, Colonel Robert B. Beath, were the following vice-presidents representing the Union League: [...] Peter D. Keyser, [...].


News of interest to the veterans [re MOLLUS]

Philadelphia Inquirer 20 October 1895 p. supplement 30
NEWS OF INTEREST TO THE VETERANS
[...]

The commandery-in-chief of the Loyal Legion of the United States met in biennial session at the Arlington Hotel last week, [...]

At the afternoon session the commandery completed the list of officers as follows: [...] Captain Peter D. Keyser, Chancellor-in-Chief; [...].


Charter applied for

Philadelphia Inquirer 20 July 1885 page 2
Court Chronicles
[...]
Charter Applied For.

The military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States on Saturday filed application for a charter in Court of Common Pleas No. 2. The object of the corporation is to cherish the memories and associations of the war in defense of the unity of the Republic, to strengthen the ties of fraternal friendship formed from companionship in arms, to advance the interests of the soldiers and sailors of the United States, especially the members of the Order, and to extend relief to their widows and children, to foster the cultivation of military and naval science and to enforce unqualified allegiance to the General Government, to protect American citizenship and to maintain national honor, union and independence. General Hancock is the commander of the Order, and associated with him as corporators of the charter are John P. Nicholson, Peter D. Keyser, William B. Rawle, James E. Carpenter and Samuel B. Huey.

[...]

The Loyal Legionin annual session (October 1896)

Philadelphia Inquirer 15 October 1896 page 3
THE LOYAL LEGION IN ANNUAL SESSION
Reports Show the Order in a Most Flourishing Condition.
[...]

THE ANNUAL SESSION OF THE Commandery in Chief of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States was held in the Historical Society's hall yesterday and Rear Admiral Gherardi was made Commander-in-Chief. Last night the visiting members were banqueted at the Union League by the Pennsylvania Commandery


[...]

Among those present at the annual sessions and the succeeding banquet from the Pennsylvania Commandery were: [... Captain Peter D. Keyser, [...].


National warriors [re MOLLUS, October 1885]

Philadelphia Inquirer 22 October 1885 page 3
NATIONAL WARRIORS.
UNION OFFICERS IN THE LOYAL LEGION.
Organization of a Commandery-in-Chief, with General Hancock at the Head--Pennsylvania's Sons in Session.

A noted gathering of military men assembled yesterday morning in the rooms of the Pennsylvania Historical Society. They were all memebers of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and met to perfect the organization of a Commander-in-Chief of the United States. The Legion is somewhat similar to the Order of Cincinnatus, formed after the Revolutionary War, and is composed exclusively of commissioned officers of the Federal forces in the late rebellion; that is, in the first class. To perpetuate the organization, sons and grandsons are admitted in lower classes, and, it is stated, a member having no direct descendents may, in his will, name his successor. There are 444 members of the first class in Pennsylvania, 14 of the second and 9 of the third.

Heretofore the Pennsylvania Commandery has been the governing commandery of the Legion.

Representatives were present yesterday from Pennsylvania, New York, Maine, Massachusetts, California, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, Minnesota and the District of Columbia. The meeting was called to order at about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, General Winfield Scott Hancock presiding. About fifty delegates were present, including [...].

Officers in Chief.

The election of officers for the Commandery-in-Chief was the only business of public interest. [...] A committee of one from each State was named to select the other officers and their report in favor of [...] Captain Peter D. Keyser, M.D., Chancellor-in-Chief, [...], was adopted.

At five o'clock in the evening, the Pennsylvania Commandery met at the Colonnade Hotel and installed its officers-elect. The following members of this city will act as a Reception Committee and look after the entertainment of the visitors: [...] Captain John H. Weeks, [...]

[...]

Dr Keyser buried

Philadelphia Inquirer 13 March 1897 page 3
DR. KEYSER BURIED
The Well-Known Physician Laid to Rest.

The funeral of Dr. Peter D. Keyser, well known as a physician and member of the Board of Health, took place yesterday afternoon from his late residence, 1832 Arch street, and was very largely attended. The services were conducted by Rev. N. S. Funst [?], of Norston, Conn., assisted by Rev. Dr. Worster, rector of St. Stephen's Protestant Episcopal Church. The pall-bearers were: Captain Collum, Commodore Potter, Charles Burns, Colonel Nicholson, General Wagner, Colonel T. Elwood Zell, Edgar Earle, M. T. S. Darley, Dr. Ford, Dr. Harlan and General Paul A. Oliver. The interment, which was private, took place at the old Mennonite Burying Ground in Germantown, where many members of Dr. Keyser's family are interred.

At a special meeting, held at noon, the Board of Health adopted resolutions of regret.


Dr Keyser dead

Philadelphia Inquirer 10 March 1897, page 11
DR. KEYSER DEAD
The Board of Health Member Passes Away After a Brief Illness.

After a brief illness from an attack of pneumonia Dr. Peter D. Keyser, one of the best known and leading physicians [picture] of the city, died at his home, 1832 Arch street, early yesterday morning.

Dr. Keyser was born in Philadelphia 63 years ago, and graduated at the local schools, after which he attended the University of Jena, Germany, where he received his degree of Doctor of Medicine. Upon his return to America he served as surgeon in the War of the Rebellion. Later on he settled in his native city and practiced medicine, in which profession he gained an enviable reputation as a specialist on opthalmalogy [sic].

He was connected with the Medico-Chirurgical Hospital for a number of years, serving as dean of the college, and afterwards as professor of opthalmology. He was one of the consulting surgeons of Wills Eye Hospital for many years, and held that position at the time of his death.

He was a close friend of former Mayor Fitler, and at his solicitation Dr. Keyser accepted a position on the Board of Health. He received his appointment on July 1, 1889, and was always an active member of the board. He was chairman of the Registration Committee and a member of several others. He leaves a widow and one daughter.

The Alumni Association of the Medico-Chirurgical College will meet at noon to-day to take action on the death of Peter D. Keyser, M.D., late Professor of Opthalmology, also dean to the Institute.


Death notice

Philadelphia Inquirer 10 March 1897 page 10 (also published on 11 March 1897 page 5 and 12 March 1897 page 9)

KEYSER.--On March 9, 1897, Peter D. Keyser, M.D. Funeral services will be held at his late residence, No. 1832 Arch street, on Friday, the 12th instant, at 2 o'clock precisely. Interment private. Kindly omit flowers.


Wills Eye Hospital

Philadelphia Inquirer 24 September 1883 page 2
Wills Eye Hospital.

Dr. Peter D. Keyser, surgeon to the Wills Eye Hospital, Fellow of the American Academy of Medicine, etc., has published a pamphlet giving some opthalmic observations during ten years' service in that institution. He states that in March, 1872, the Board of City Trusts increased the surgical staff of the Wills Eye Hospital so as to extend the usefulness of the institution in having daily clinics, and more medical officers to attend the augmented number of patients applying for relief. At first the intended clinics were rather small, as the patients so cured were divided among the few attending surgeons; but the increase of the patients has been so great, and with a reduction of the staff to four each day, the clinics have become quite large, so that, with the old and new patients, from one to two hundred persons are treated daily. During his ten years' service Dr. Keyser has had attending his clinic 5243 patients, classified as follows: Affection of the lids, 390; of the lachrymal apparatus, 164; muscular and nervous affections, 262 [?]; anomalies of refraction and accomodation, 913; diseases of the conjunctiva, 1211; of the cornea and sclerotica, 1146; of the iris, ciliary body and choroid, 454; of the retina and optic nerve, 211; of the crystalline lens, 330; of the vitreous body, 57; of the eye ball orbit, etc., 165. The number of operations performed during the same period was 1282.


Loyal Legion [February 1884]

Philadelphia Inquirer 7 February 1884 page 3
Loyal Legion.

A meeting of the Loyal Legion of the United States was held last evening at the Union League assembly room. The attendance was unusually large. Vice-Commander Peter D. Keyser, M.D., presided, and, after the transaction of the business of the session and the election of a number of new members, the Recorder, Colonel John P. Nicholson, was presented with a silver tea set, consisting of six magnificent pieces. Colonel Nicholson, so skilfully had the secret been kept, was completely taken by surprise, and replied with deep emotion to the presentation speech by Major S. B. Huey, who begged his acceptance of the above described tribute in the name of the Commandery. A banquet, served in Mr. Finelli's best style, succeeded the session and brought the evening to an agreeable close.


News censorship [re Board of Health]

Philadelphia Inquirer 4 March 1896, page 4
NEWS CENSORSHIP
The Board of Health to Keep the Public in the Dark

Dr. Peter D. Keyser, of the Board of Health, believes that himself and the other members of the board know better what news is than do the newspaper reporters, who haunt the Bureau of Health in the search for items.

The doctor got in an upper cut and a cross counter at the same time at yesterday's meeting of the board. He offered a resolution, which was adopted, to the effect that all annual reports shall not be read in public. Instead they shall be turned over to a committee, which shall read and digest them and then prepare for presentation to the board and the newspapers a brief extract, and that no report shall be given to the public except as prepared according to the new rule.

This was said to be a slap at Dr. Ford, whom Dr. Keyser thinks gives out too much news to the papers. Dr. Ford thought Dr. Keyser's resolution was personal. He (Keyser) had objected to him (Ford) as president pro tem., and also as to his giving out news. Dr. Ford further said he did now know Dr. Keyser's reasons for such objections, but hoped he would state them.

In reply, Dr. Keyser disclaimed any attempt at personalities. He considered it his duty as a member of the board, as he thought the division chiefs would be afraid to make reports if everything was to be given out. The doctor objected on his own behalf to reading reports in the newspapers before he heard them read at the board.

The effect of this new rule, it is said, will be that such facts as the distributing of food from the water closets in the Municipal Hospital, will not be given out to the newspapers.


News down in Delaware

Philadelphia Inquirer 28 February 1896 page 2
NEWS DOWN IN DELAWARE
Special to The Inquirer.

WILMINGTON, Feb. 27.--The dinner given by the Alumni Association of Delaware College in the New Century Club Building, in this city, this evening, was the most successful one every given by that organization. [...] Dr. Peter Keyser, of Philadelphia, [spoke] on "The Influence of the Dutch on the Education of Delaware:" [...]


Loyal Legion [April 1881]

Philadelphia Inquirer 13 April 1881, page 3
LOYAL LEGION
The Quadrennial Congress to Assemble This Evening.

The Quadrennial Congress of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States will assemble at the St. George Hotel, Broad and Walnut streets, this evening, at half-past eight o'clock. The congress will be comprised of three delegates from each and every commandery.

The Pennsylvania Commandery has named the following companions as a committee on reception of the representatives: [...] Capt. Peter D. Keyser, M.D., late Pennsylvania Volunteers; [...]

[...]

The healing art [re a paper at the American Academy of Medicine meeting]

Philadelphia Inquirer, 29 October 1884, page 4
THE HEALING ART
Meeting of the American Academy of Medicine.
[SPECIAL DISPATCH TO THE INQUIRER.]

BALTIMORE, Oct. 28--The ninth annual meeting of the American Academy of Medicine began to-day at Johns Hopkins University hall, where the proceedings were opened with prayer by Rev. Dr. J. E. Grammar. After the transaction of some routine business an interesting paper was read by Dr. Peter D. Keyser of Philadelphia, on the "Relation of Medical Colleges to Preliminary Education." [...]


Mr Fitler's funeral

Philadelphia Inquirer, 3 June 1896, page 3
MR. FITLER'S FUNERAL
Arrangements for the Obsequies Completed--Union League's Tribute.

The final arrangements for the funeral of the late ex-Mayor Edwin H. Fitler, which will be held to-morrow, were about completed yesterday. [...]

Mayor Warwick's offer to have the members of the Police and Fire Departments who served under Mr. Fitler act as pall-bearers has been accepted by the family, who have in addition named the following honorary pall-bearers: [...], Dr. Peter D. Keyser, [...]

[...]

The business meeting [re MOLLUS]

Philadelphia Inquirer, 15 October 1891, page 2
THE BUSINESS MEETING.
Held in the Building of the Historical Society.

Within the building of the Historical Society--that home of the traditions of American heroes, warriors and statesmen--there assembled yesterday the Commandery-in-Chief of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Their purpose was the holding of the annual meeting, the consideration of questions of great moment to the Legion and the election of officers.

[...] Those members of the commandery-in-chief who were present were:

[...] Captain Peter D. Keyser [...]

[...]

The committee appointed for the purpose of recommending names for officers of the commandery-in-chief, reported unanimously the choice of the following gentlemen: [...] Captain Peter D. Keyser; [...]


Caught on the fly [re Reception for Professor DaCosta]

Philadelphia Inquirer, 27 April 1895, page 5
CAUGHT ON THE FLY.

Many of the most distinguished physicians in the city attended the reception given at the Hotel Bellevue last night in honor of Professor J. Chalmers Da Costa, by the Medical Club of Philadelphia. Professor Da Costa shares with Professor Pepper the distinction of being the favorite consultants of the majority of the city's physicians, as a court of last resort. [...] About 200 physicians attended the reception, including [...] Peter D. Keyser [...].


Loyal Legion encampment [October 1886]

Philadelphia Inquirer 21 October 1886, page 8
LOYAL LEGION ENCAMPMENT.
The Meeting of the Commandery-in-Chief and Banquet at the Union League.

The annual encampment of the Commandery-in-Chief of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion was commenced yesterday, and continued until last evening in the hall of the Pennsylvania Historical Society, at Thirteenth and Locust streets. The meeting, though small in numbers, comprised men who had distinguished themselves in the wars of the country and served the people in places of trust.

Among the most conspicuous were: [...] and Captain Peter D. Keyser [...], all of Philadelphia; [...]


President Benson's reception

Philadelphia Inquirer 3 January 1888, page 2
[...]
President Benson's Reception.

There was a great throng at the Union League all day. President Edwin N. Benson held a reception during the afternoon, which was attended by nearly seven hundred members and invited guests. [...]

[...]

Others present were [...]Dr. Peter D. Keyser, [...].


[...]
At the United Service Club

The hospitality of soldiers and sailors is proverbial, and therefore it is no wonder that the United Service Club premises were well patronized by those who desires to meet once more with some of the battle-scarred veterans of the late unpleasantness. Among those who foregathered in the time honored New Year's style were [...] Captain P. D. Keyser, [...]


About town [re Pastorius memorial]

Philadelphia Inquirer 8 June 1885 page 3
ABOUT TOWN.
Summary of Incidents of Local and General Interest.
[...]

Chairman William G Foulke has appointed as the committee to take action, in accordance with the instructions of the meeting held in Germantown, relative to a memorial for Francis Daniel Pastorius, [...] Peter D. Keyser, [...]


News of interest to the veterans [re MOLLUS, 1896]

Philadelphia Inquirer 18 October 1896 page 24
NEWS OF INTEREST TO THE VETERANS
[...]

The annual session of the Commandery-in-Chief of the Loyal Legion of the United States, which was held in the city last week, was an event of interest to all old soldiers.

[...]

Among those present at the annual sessions and the succeeding banquet from the Pennsylvania Commandery were: [...] Captain Peter D. Keyser, [...].

death certificate

[death certificate, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 8 March 1897, #19232, Peter D Keyser]
[thanks to Ed McLaughlin for finding this!]

RETURN OF A DEATH
IN THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA.
19232
PHYSICIAN'S CERTIFICATE.
1. Name of Deceased, Dr. Peter D. Keyser
2. Color, White
3. Sex, Male
4. Age, 62 years
5. Married
6. Date of Death, March 8th [sic], 1897
7. Cause of Death, Pleuro-pneumonia
Tho [?] Drysdale [?], M.D.
Residence, 1307 Locust St.

UNDERTAKER'S CERTIFICATE IN RELATION TO DECEASED.
8. Occupation, Physician
9. Place of Birth, Philadelphia
10. When a Minor, [blank]
11. Ward, Ninth Ward
12. Street and Number, 1832 Arch St
13. Date of Burial, March 12, 1897.
14. Place of Burial, Dunkard Ground Germantown
R. R. Bringhurst Undertaker.
Residence, 38 N.11th St.
per I.M.I.

MOLLUS memorial circular

['In memoriam: Peter Dirck Keyser', circular 15, series of 1897, whole no. 340, in Memorial circulars, Commandery of Pennsylvania 1880-1899]
Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States
COMMANDERY OF THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA.
In Memoriam
PETER DIRCK KEYSER
Captain 91st Penna. Infantry
DIED AT PHILADELPHIA, PA., MARCH 9, 1897.

Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States
HEADQUARTERS COMMANDERY OF THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA
CIRCULAR NO. 15, Series of 1897. Whole No. 340.
Philadelphia, June 1, 1897.

PETER DIRCK KEYSER.
Captain 91st Pennsylvania Infantry September 21, 1861; resigned August 15, 1862.
Acting Assistant Surgeon U.S. Army June 18, 1864; resigned March 9, 1865.
One of the founders of the Order, April 15, 1865. Class 1. Insignia 3.
Chancellor of Commandery, 1865-1866.
Treasurer of Commandery, 1869 1873 [sic].
Junior Vice-Commander of Commandery February 5, 1883-1885.
Representative from the Commandery to the Fifth Quadrennial Congress of the Order.
Born February 8, 1835, at Philadelphia.
Died March 9, 1897, at Philadelphia.

In the death of Companion Peter D. Keyser, the Loyal Legion has lost one of its most devoted and genial members; none took more interest in the Order. It is now thirty-two years in April, that Companion Keyser assisted by other interested friends, met and organized the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. The Order had its beginning on or about the day of the assassination of the martyred President Lincoln. A tribute to one who thus aided in founding and shaping the course of the organization, now counting over ten thousand commissioned officers who served in the Rebellion, is eminently appropriate, and that especial mention should be made of this beginning of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, and of Companion Keyser's connection with it.

At the time of his death, Companion Keyser was Chancellor-in-Chief, having also served as Junior Vice-Commander of the Pennsylvania Commandery from 1883 to 1885, and as Treasurer from 1869 to 1873.

Of the social characteristics of Companion Keyser, may be mentioned a disposition the most cheerful, cordial in manner, bright in intellect, an ornament to society, a loving husband and father and beloved by his friends. In his profession he ranked high. Among the earliest to bring especial training to especial treatment, he brought with him from abroad, acquired by his studies in the University of Berlin, Munich and Jena, graduating at the latter, a knowledge as oculist which eminently fitted him for his subsequent position in the Wills Eye Hospital of Philadelphia, and other similar institutions, for treatment especially of the eye. For ten years he was connected with the Medico-Chirurgical College as Professor of Ophthalmology, and the Dead of the Faculty for nine years. Hew as also member of varioius medical, surgical, literary and historical societies here and abroad. Also member of the Sons of the Revolution, being a descendant of Colonel John Eyre, who commanded the Philadelphia Artillery in the Revolutionary War, and at one time President of the Netherlands Society of Philadelphia; also member of the Union League and the United Service Clubs.

Companion Keyser was honorably mustered out of service August 15, 1862, on physician's certificate, having received injuries while serving in the Army of the Potomac on General Henry M. Naglee's Staff in the Chickahominy campaign.

Dr. Keyser was born in Philadelphia, February 8, 1835, son of Peter A. Keyser, a man wll and favorably known to the elder Philadelphians as a cordial friend and upright man. Dr. Keyser's forefather, Dirck Keyser, emigrated from Amsterdam, Holland, in 1688, and settled in Germantown. His family were religious refugees from Germany, where one of his ancestors suffered death because of his religious belief.

Dr. Keyser's illness was brief; taken on Friday with a cold, which settled on his lungs, he died on the following Tuesday, March 9th, fully conscious of his approaching end. He was laid to rest in the old Dunkard burying-ground, beside his ancestors, March 12, 1897. He leaves a widow and a daughter. Can we end this said tribute better than in quoting the words of the text, "I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith."



T. ELWOOD ZELL, Lt. Colonel 3d Battalion Penna. Infantry.
PAUL A. OLIVER, Brevet Brig.-General U.S. Vols.
CHARLES M. BURNS, Acting Asst.-Paymaster U.S. Navy.
AUGUSTINE T. LYNCH, Lt.-Colonel 183d Penna. Infantry.
GEO. C. HARLAN, Major and Surgeon 12th Penna. Cavalry.
JOSEPH GILBERT, Captain 91st Pennna. Infantry.
Committee

By Command of Major General D. McM. GREGG, U.S.V., Commander
JOHN P. NICHOLSON, Recorder.

Official.

Recorder.

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revised 30 Sep 10
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