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                      HEADQUARTERS TWENTIETH AIR FORCE
                          APO 234, c/o Postmaster
                         San Francisco, California

                                                          13 November 1945
GENERAL ORDERS )
               :
NO. . . .  106 )

DISTINGUISHED UNIT CITATION--As authorized by Executive Order 9396 (Sec I,
WD Bull 22, 1943), superseding Executive Order 9075 (Sec III, WD Bul, 11 1942),
and under the provisions of paragraph 2d(1), Section IV, Circular No 333 WD
  1943; and letter, Headquarters United States Army Strategic Air Forces, file AG
 200.6, subject: "Distinguished Unit Badge," dated 11 October 1945, the follow-
ing units are cited for outstanding performance of duty in action against the
enemy:

   The 498th Bombardment Group (VH) is cited for outstanding performance of
duty in armed conflict with the enemy.  Alerted to prepare maximum aircraft for
a mission against the highly important and heavily-defended Mitsubishi Aircraft
Engine Plant, Nagoya, the ground crews worked steadily and untiringly throughout
the day and night  to have their B-29's in perfect operating condition for this
important strike. This plant was one of the two largest airplane engine producing
plants in Japan.  On 13 December 1944, 29 Superfortresses of this group, heavily
loaded with high explosive bombs, took off on their hazardous 1500 mile flight
over enemy-controlled open sea to the target.  The crews manning the relatively
untested aircraft were in constant danger of mechanical failure and consequent
ditching many miles at sea, with no adequate rescue patrol as yet established.
No emergency base was available for battle damaged or distressed planes anywhere
along the 1500 mile return to bases past numerous enemy island garrisons of
unknown strength.  The mission was flown at an altitude of 27,000 feet where
severe frosting was a constant threat to formation flying and battle damage
often resulted in depressurization and constant frostbite in temperatures
averaging minus 55 degrees centigrade.  Winds in excess of 200 miles per hour
further complicated the many difficulties of navigation over open sea.
Inadequate maps and charts for target recognition, and non-availability of
accurate weather forecasts in the face of the most adverse and rapidly changing
weather encountered in any theatre presented almost insurmountable difficulties
to the pioneering crews.  In addition, no fighter escort was available at this
early period.  As their formation reached landfall it was engaged by waves of
persistent and highly aggressive enemy fighters which made a total of 107
attacks.  Repeated barrages from anti-aircraft rocked the B-29's.  Despite the
long and tiring flight to the target, the heavy flak, and the fierce fighter
attacks, the intrepid crews continued grimly and steadfastly on their assigned
course and bombed the target area by radar with excellent results, considering
the size of the force employed.  Despite the intense anti-aircraft fire and
aggressive fighter opposition, the formation, by the highest professional skill
was able to return to the base with only one plane lost and five seriously battle
damaged.  The Gallant crews destroyed three enemy aircraft, probably destroyed
eight, and caused major damage to ten more.  The conspicuous courage, airmanship
and intrepid determination of the combat crews, together with the superior
technical skill and devotion to duty of the ground personnel of the 498th
Bombardment Group (VH) are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military
service, and reflect great credit on themselves and the Army Air Forces.

   The 499th Bombardment Group (VH) is cited for outstanding performance of
duty in armed conflict with the enemy.  Alerted to prepare maximum aircraft for
a mission against the highly important and heavily-defended Mitsubishi Aircraft
Engine Plant, Nagoya, the ground crews worked steadily and untiringly throughout
the day and night  to have their B-29's in perfect operating condition for this
important strike.  Their target, it was estimated, was producing at this time
30 to 40% of all Japanese airplane engines.  On 23 January 1945, 17
Superfortresses of this group, heavily loaded with high explosive bombs, took
off on their hazardous 1500 mile flight over enemy-controlled open sea to the
target.  The crews manning the relatively untested aircraft were in constant
danger of mechanical failure and consequent ditching many miles at sea, with no
adequate rescue patrol as yet established.  No emergency base was available for
battle damaged or distressed planes anywhere along the 1500 mile return to bases
past numerous enemy island garrisons of unknown strength.  The mission was flown
at an altitude of 27,000 feet where severe frosting was a consequent threat to
formation flying and battle damage often resulted in depressurization and
constant frostbite in temperatures averaging minus 55 degrees centigrade.
Winds in excess of 200 miles per hour further complicated the many difficulties

                                      -1-


General Orders No 106                                            13 November 1945

of navigation over open sea.  Inadequate maps and charts for target recognition,
and non-availability  of accurate weather forecasts in the face of the most adverse
and rapidly changing weather encountered in any theatre presented almost
insurmountable difficulties to the pioneering crews.  In addition, no fighter
escort was available at this early period.  As their formation approached the
target area, it was engaged by 125 enemy fighters which made a total of 233
attacks on the gallant crews.  At the same time the formation was subjected to
intense anti-aircraft fire.  Despite the long and tiring flight to the target,
the heavy flak, and the fierce fighter attacks, the intrepid crews continued
grimly and steadfastly on their assigned course and released their powerful load
of high explosives on the target with excellent results.  In the face of this
overwhelming combination of enemy aircraft and ground defenses, by their superior
airmanship and professional skill they were able to leave the target with but
six B-29's seriously damaged.  The outstanding courage, conspicuous gallantry
and expert tactics of the combat crews and the grim determination and technical
mastery of the ground personnel of the 499th Bombardment Group (VH) reflect the
highest credit on themselves and the Army Air Forces.

   The 500th Bombardment Group (VH) is cited for outstanding performance of
duty in armed conflict with the enemy.  Notified to prepare maximum aircraft for
a mission against the highly importany and heavily defended Mitsubishi Aircraft
Engine Plant, Nagoya, the ground crews worked steadily and untiringly throughout
the day and night to have their B-29's in perfect operating condition for this
important strike.  At the time of the attack, this plant was estimated to be
producing from 30 to 40% of all Japanese airplane engines.   On 23 January 1945,
17 Superfortresses of this group, heavily loaded with high explosive bombs, took
off on their hazardous 1500 mile flight over enemy-controlled open sea to the
target.  The crews manning the relatively untested aircraft were in constant
 danger of mechanical failure and consequent ditching many miles at sea, with
no adequate rescue patrol as yet established.   No emergency base was available
 for battle damaged or distressed planes anywhere along the 1500 mile return to
bases past numerous enemy island garrisons of unknown strength.  The mission was
flown at an altitude of 26,000 feet where severe frosting was a constant threat
to formation flying and battle damage often resulted in depressurization and
consequent frostbite in temperatures averaging minus 55 degrees centigrade.
Winds in excess of 200 miles per hour further complicated the many difficulties
of navigation over open sea.   Inadequate maps and charts for target recognition,
and non-availability of accurate weather forecasts in the face of the most
adverse and rapidly changing weather encountered in any theatre presented
almost insurmountable difficulties to the pioneering crews.  In addition, no
fighter escort was available at this early period.  As their formation approached
the target area, it was engaged by 160 aggressive enemy fighters which made a
total of 253 determined attacks on the intrepid crews.   At the same time the
formation was rocked by heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fire.   Despite the
long and tiring flight to the target, the heavy flak, and the fierce fighter
opposition, the gallant crews continued grimly and steadfastly on their assigned
course and released their powerful load of high explosives on the target
with excellent results.  Although one B-29 was lost and ten of the bombers seriously
damaged, the formation destroyed fifteen enemy planes, probably destroyed eight
and seriously damaged six.  The heroic determination and combat efficiency of
the airplane crews, together with the professional skill and intense devotion
to duty of the ground personnel, of the 500th Bombardment Group (VH) reflect
great credit on themselves and the Army Air Forces.

        BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL PARKER:

                                                            R K TAYLOR
						    Brigadier General, USA
OFFICIAL:						Chief of Staff
        s/ Gustav A Neuberg
	   GUSTAV A NEUBERG
	   Lt Col, AGD
           Adjutant General

  THIS IS A TRUE COPY:
        
        WILLIAM H. HAINES III
	Captain, Air Corps.

                                        -2-
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