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on the link Thurmaston Military Indexes


Adcock, Charles Harry

 

Charles Harry Adcock was born at Thurmaston on the 2nd September 1893, the eldest child of Charles William Adcock and his wife Elizabeth, nee Hunt. The family lived in Thurmaston until about 1900, and thereafter lived in nearby Syston. In 1911 the head of the Adcock family was working as a foundry hand, for a stove grate manufacturer, whilst Charles Harry was working as a laster in a shoe works.

Charles Harry Adcock served as Private, 75901, C. H. Adcock, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (K.O.Y.L.I.).

His younger brother, George William Adcock (q.v.), died of his wounds during the Great War.

Charles Harry Adcock died in Leicestershire during 1976.

 

Adcock, George William

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

George William Adcock was born in Thurmaston in 1896, the son of Charles William and Elizabeth Adcock. The family lived in Thurmaston until about 1900, and thereafter lived in nearby Syston. In 1911 the head of the Adcock family was working as a foundry hand, for a stove grate manufacturer, whilst George William was working in an office at a basket works.

George William Adcock enlisted into the army at Leicester, and became Private, 25943, G. W. Adcock, of the Leicestershire Regiment.

He later transferred to the Machine Gun Corps (M.G.C.), becoming Private, 44366, George William Adcock, M.G.C.. He died of wounds whilst serving with the 4th Battalion Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) on the 18th April 1918. By the close of the Great War his parents were living at 5, Flax Road, Leicester.

He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial (Panel 136), France.

He was posthumously awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

His elder brother, Charles Harry Adcock (q.v.), also served in the army during the Great War.

 

Allen, Thomas Claude William

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Thomas Claude William Allen was born in 1895. At the age of 19, having previously worked as a chauffeur, he joined the Army Service Corps (A.S.C.) on the 8th May 1915, at Nottingham. On the 12th April 1916 he embarked aboard ship at Southampton, and disembarked the following day in Rouen, for service with the 607th Company A.S.C.

From 31st October 1917 he served with British Forces in Italy until the Autumn of 1918. He then returned to England, but had a further period of post-war service in France. Private, 102397, Thomas C. W. Allen was finally demoblised in September 1919, and returned to his mother's home in Berkeley Street, Thurmaston.
He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

 

Allen, Thomas

1914-15 StarBritish War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Thomas Allen was the son of Thomas Allen and his wife Mary Cooke Allen. He was born on the 24th September 1887.

He joined the Grenadier Guards as a private soldier, but on the 24th September 1914 he became Second Lieutenant Thomas Allen when he was commissioned into the Irish Guards. Just over 5 months later, whilst serving with the 1st Battalion Irish Guards, he was killed in action on the 25-26th February 1915. He is interred in Cuinchy Communal Cemetery, France. He is also commemorated on the War Memorial at Thurmaston, and on a family tomb that is within the churchyard of St. Michael and All Angels Church, Thurmaston.

He was posthumously awarded the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service. His parents resided at Wayside, Kemerton, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire.

 

Allott, Ernest

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Ernest Allott was born at Thurmaston in 1890. He was the son of Joseph Allott, a framework-knitter, and his wife Elizabeth, nee Smith.

Prior to the Great War had worked as a butcher for B. Lane's of Thurmaston. He enlisted into the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 23701 on the 12th October 1915, thereafter serving with the 10th Battalion.

Allott's army career was very eventful, not always staying on the right side of army authority, he undertook many tours of duty in France and was wounded several times. We suffered a gun shot wound to his left shoulder on the 16th September 1916, which resulted in treatment at the 14th Casualty Clearing Station and the 9th General Hospital. In 1917, on the 31st October, he again suffered a similar wound to his left forearm, on which occasion he was treated by the 3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Station and the 7th Canadian General Hospital. In 1918 he was posted to the 6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, and soon thereafter to the 11th Battalion. On the 23rd March 1918 he suffered a further gun shot wound to his left hand and was treated by the 56th Casualty Clearing Station and the 56th General Hospital at Etaples, France.

In 1918, following a disciplinary action, he was transferred to the 1st Battalion of the East Lancashire Regiment, which he joined on the 10th August 1918, although within less than a month he was posted to the 11th Battalion of the Regiment. Private, 33505, Allott, East Lancashire Regiment was eventually transferred to the Class 'Z' Reserve on the 29th March 1919. He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

 

Allott, Franklin

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Franklin Allott was the son of basket maker Daniel Allott and his wife Rosetta. He was born in Thurmaston in 1892. Prior to the Great War he had also worked as a basket maker.

By 1916 he had joined His Majesty's Forces, at which time he was living on Main Street, Thurmaston North End. He served as Private, 25153, F. Allott, Leicestershire Regiment. He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

He was a member of Thurmaston Conservative Club. He died in Leicestershire in 1958.

 

Angrave, Gerald Levi

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Gerald Levi Angrave, who was born in Thurmaston during 1896, was the son of Oliver George Angrave, a brickyard labourer, and his wife Rachel, nee Toon. Prior to the Great War he had worked as a grocer's assistant.

Gerald Levi Angrave enlisted into the army at Leicester, and served as Private, 5870, G. L. Angrave, of the Leicestershire Regiment.

He was serving as Private, 40996, G. L. Angrave, 19th Battalion Manchester Regiment, when he was killed in action on the 14th October 1916. His brother Harold Angrave lived at 73, Main Street, Thurmaston.

He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the missing of the Somme (Pier and Face 13A and 14C), France, and on the War Memorial at Thurmaston. Additionally, his name was also commemorated on a memorial plaque inside Thurmaston Wesleyan Methodist Chapel.

He was posthumously awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

 

Appleby, Arthur

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Arthur Appleby was the son of Joseph Appleby, a carpenter, and his wife Ann. He was also the elder brother of George Ernest Appleby (q.v.).

In 1918 Arthur Appleby's home was at 3, Brook Street, Thurmaston, at which time he was serving as Private, 21703, A. Appleby, 2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment.

Later in the war he transferred to the Royal Engineers (RE) and served as Private, WR/286292, Arthur Appleby.

He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

 

Appleby, George Ernest

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

In 1894 the registrar for Barrow-on-Soar district recorded that Ernest George Appleby had been born. He was the son of Joseph Appleby, a carpenter, and his wife Ann. He was also the younger brother of Arthur Appleby (q.v.).

In later life it would seen that his christian names were transposed, and so it was that George Ernest Appleby of Thurmaston enlisted in the army on the 11th December 1915 in the neighbouring village of Syston. He was held on reserve until he was mobilized and attested to the Leicestershire Regiment on the 28th January 1916 at Leicester, as Private, 24865, Appleby. Prior to joining the army the 21 year old had worked as an iron fettler. After training was over his service in France began on the 26th February 1917, after his unit made the Channel crossing from Folkestone to Bolougne. On the 13th October 1917, whilst serving with the 2/5th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment), he received a gun shot wound, but rejoined for duty later in the month.

On the 21st March 1918 he was reported missing. Private, 202046, George Ernest Appleby, 2/5th Battalion Sherwood Foresters, was later confirmed killed in action, age 24 years. His parents, Joseph and Annie Appleby, lived at 261, Main Street, Thurmaston. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial (Bay 7), France, and on the War Memorial at Thurmaston. Additionally, h
is name was also commemorated on a memorial plaque inside Thurmaston Wesleyan Methodist Chapel.

He was posthumously awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

 

Bailey, George

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

George Bailey was born in the Leicestershire village of Thrussington on the 29th May 1897. He was the son of the village blacksmith Charles Bailey, and his wife Susan, nee Starmer. The couple had moved to the village from Cosby, Leicestershire, in around 1896. By the time George Bailey was thirteen years' old he was working as an apprentice baker.

On the 3rd August 1917 George Bailey joined the Royal Naval Air Service (R.N.A.S.) for the duration of the war and would serve as Observer/Gunlayer, 23001, G. Bailey. In 1918 the Royal Air Force (R.A.F.) was formed on the amalgamation of the Royal Flying Corps (R.F.C.) with the R.N.A.S. at which time George Bailey became Private, 222522, G. Bailey, R.A.F. He served as an aerial gunner with the R.A.F.

In 1918 George Bailey's home address was 4, Red Hill Lane, Thurmaston. He later lived in a house on Humberstone Lane, Thurmaston, before moving to nearby Wanlip, where he died during the summer of 1973.

He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his service overseas.

 

Bailey, George Henry

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

George Henry Bailey enlisted into the army on the 30th August 1916. In 1918 George Henry Bailey was a registered voter at 183, Main Street, Thurmaston. George served with the Army Service Corps (A.S.C.); and in 1918 he with the 648th Motor Transport Company of the A.S.C.

Private, M2/226314, G. H. Bailey, was discharged from the army on the 15th March 1919, on account of his health, he received the Silver War Badge in recognition of his services.

He was also awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his service overseas.

 

Baldwin, Frederick William

Military MedalBritish War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Frederick William Baldwin was the born in Thurmaston in about 1895. He was the son of Thomas Baldwin, a railway signalman, and his wife Harriet. Thomas and Harriet Baldwin had settled in Thurmaston in about 1881. In 1911 Frederick William Baldwin, then working as a hosiery hand, lived with his widower father, his elder sister, Mary Ann, and one of his elder brothers, Alfred, at a house in Brook Street, Thurmaston.

In 1918 Frederick William Baldwin's home address was 13, Church Street, Thurmaston, and at that time he was serving as Gunner, 141780, F. W. Baldwin, with the 296th Siege Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery (R.G.A.).

On the 11th February 1919 (page 2093) his name appeared in the Supplement to the London Gazette. This was because Gunner, (Acting Sergeant), F. W. Baldwin, serving with the 296th Siege Battery, R.G.A., had been awarded the Military Medal for Bravery in the Field.

Besides his award of the Military Medal, he was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service. His elder brother, James Baldwin (q.v.), also served with the R.G.A. during the Great War.

Frederick William Baldwin died in Leicestershire in 1964.

 

Baldwin, James

 

James Baldwin was the born in Thurmaston on the 16th August 1886. He was the son of Thomas and Harriet Baldwin. His father, who was a railway signalman, and his mother, had settled in Thurmaston in about 1880. After his marriage in 1910 James Baldwin lived at Scarisbrick Villas, Thurmaston, with his wife Gertrude Annie, nee Blount.

On the 8th December 1915 twenty nine years' old James Baldwin, of 277, Main Street, Thurmaston, who worked in the shoe trade, was attested to the army. The following year he was mobilised and sent to South Camp, near Ripon, Yorkshire. There he was appointed to the Royal Garrison Artillery (R.G.A.).

On the 9th December 1918, Gunner, 133587, James Baldwin, R.G.A., was discharged from the army, being no longer physically fit for war service. He returned to a new home at 30, Brook Street, Thurmaston.

His younger brother, Frederick William Baldwin (q.v.), also served with the R.G.A. during the Great War.

James Baldwin died in Leicestershire in 1970.

 

Ballard, Ernest William

 

Ernest William Ballard was born in Thurmaston in around 1891. He was the son of Edward and Elizabeth Ballard.

The Ballard family had become settled in Thurmaston in around 1886, and by 1891 were living in Canal Street, with the head of the family, Edward Ballard, working as a market gardener. However, by 1901 Edward Ballard had become a licensed victualler and kept the Barkby Arms at 125, Bedford Street, Leicester. He and his family then moved back to Thurmaston, and by 1908 they were at the Black Horse on Thurmaston's Main Street. In 1911 Ernest William Ballard was working as a basket maker.

By 1916 Ernest William Ballard had joined His Majesty's Forces.

His elder brother, Thomas Edward Ballard (q.v.), and his younger brother Joseph Ballard (q.v.) served in the army during the Great War.

Joseph Ballard was a member of Thurmaston Conservative Club.

 

Ballard, Joseph

 

Joseph Ballard was born in Thurmaston in around 1894. He was the son of Edward and Elizabeth Ballard.

The Ballard family had become settled in Thurmaston in around 1886, and by 1891 were living in Canal Street, with the head of the family, Edward Ballard, working as a market gardener. However, by 1901 Edward Ballard had become a licensed victualler and kept the Barkby Arms at 125, Bedford Street, Leicester. He and his family then moved back to Thurmaston, and by 1908 they were at the Black Horse on Thurmaston's Main Street. At that time Joseph Ballard was working as a finisher in the boot and shoe trade.

In 1916 Joseph Ballard became Private, 264144, J. Ballard, when he enlisted into the army. By 1918 he was serving with the 482nd Agricultural Company of the Labour Corps. Joseph Ballard and his wife Florence Maud had their family home at 236, Main Street, Thurmaston.

His elder brothers, Thomas Edward Ballard (q.v.), and Ernest William Ballard also served their country during the Great War.

Joseph Ballard was a member of Thurmaston Conservative Club.

 

Ballard, Thomas Edward



 

Thomas Edward Ballard was born in the parish of Birstall, Leicestershire in around 1880. He was the son of Edward Ballard, a bricklayer's labourer, and his wife Elizabeth.

The Ballard family became settled in Thurmaston in around 1886, and by 1891 were living in Canal Street, with the head of the family, Edward Ballard, working as a market gardener. However, by 1901 Edward Ballard had become a licensed victualler and kept the Barkby Arms at 125, Bedford Street, Leicester. Thomas Edward, who was working as a basket maker, lived with his parents at the public house.

By 1908 Edward Ballard and his family had moved back to Thurmaston where he took on the license of the Black Horse on Main Street. However, Thomas Edward Ballard, who had been married for three years, was working as a farm labourer, and living at 26, Cooper Street, Leicester, with his wife, Edith, nee Mayes, and daughter Edna.

By the beginning of December 1915 Thomas Edward Ballard was back in Thurmaston, and living at 15, Church Street. It was on the 6th December 1915 that he joined the ranks of the Leicestershire Regiment, and was attested to the regiment on the 7th June 1916.

Perhaps because of his age and marital status, Private, 238161, Thomas Edward Ballard saw no overseas service. In June 1917 he was transferred to an agricultural company of the Labour Corps. On demobilisation he was transferred to Class "Z" of the army reserve. He informed the army authorities that his home address remained at 15, Church Street, Thurmaston.

His younger brothers, Ernest William Ballard (q.v.) and Joseph Ballard (q.v.), also served their country during the Great War.

Thomas Edward Ballard died in 1956.

 

Bates, Bertie Smith

Bertie Smith Bates

 

Bertie Smith Bates was born in Thurmaston on the 10th November 1893. He was the son of Thurmaston man George Bates, a gas works labourer, and his wife Mary. Bertie was the couple's third son and fourth child. As a young boy Bertie lived with his parents and siblings at a house in Berkeley Street, Thurmaston.

In 1918 Bertie Smith Bates of 20, Main Street, Thurmaston was serving in the army as Private, 224507, B. Bates, of the 250th Divisional Employment Company of the Labour Corps.

Bert Bates, as he was known, married Winifred Holmes and the couple had two children, Leslie Maurice Bates and Eunice Bates. Prior to the Great War Bert Bates worked as a shoehand. He later worked for the British United Shoe Machinery Company (BUSMC), Belgrave Road, Leicester.

Bertie Smith Bates died in Leicestershire on the 29th November 1965. His brothers, Ernest Bates (q.v.) and Walter Smith Bates (q.v.), also served during the Great War.

Bates, Ernest William & Alice Bates

Ernest and Alice Bates

 

Ernest Bates was born in Thurmaston, he was the eldest child, and the first of nine children, of Thurmaston man George Bates, a gas works labourer, and his wife Mary. As a young boy Ernest lived with his parents and siblings at a house in Berkeley Street, Thurmaston.

Ernest Bates of Humberstone Lane, Thurmaston, had joined the army by 1915. On the 11th September 1915 he married Alice Ellis at Thurmaston parish church, in uniform.

The couple had five children, Douglas, Ernest Roy, Neville, Ellis and Aileen Bates. The young men of the family served in the 1939-1945 war, for their details see the 1939-1945 index.

Ernest Bates was a member of Thurmaston Conservative Club.

Ernest Bates' brothers, Walter Smith Bates (q.v.) and Bertie Smith Bates (q.v.), also served during the Great War.

 

Bates, Joseph Cyril

 

Joseph Cyril Bates was born at Thurmaston in about 1895. He was the son of Thurmaston born Samuel Bates, a framework-knitter and his wife Sarah. By the age of 17 Joseph Cyril Bates was residing in Kilburn, London, and it was at Pound Lane, Willesden Green, that he joined the 1/9th Territorial Battation of the Duke of Cambridge's Own Middlesex Regiment on the 25th January 1912.

Prior to the Great War he took part in annual regimental training exercises. However, with the outbreak of war he was transferred to the 2/9th Battalion, with which he served until the 14th June 1915. After a short period of service with the 63rd Provisional Battalion he was demobilised, and thereafter served at the administration centre of the 9th Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment. He was discharged from service on the 7th February 1917. Private, 908, Joseph Cyril Bates, did not undertake any overseas service.

 

Bates, Louis

Magpies Goalkeeper Louis Bates British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Louis Bates was born at Thurmaston on the 30th June 1890 and baptised the following month, on the 31st August, at Thurmaston parish church. He was the son of Joseph Bates, a shoe-finisher, and his wife Mary Ann.

Louis Bates was attested to the army at Leicester on the 11th December 1915, and was appointed to the Royal Garrison Artillery (R.G.A.) the following year. On joining the army Louis, a caneworker by trade, lived at 4, Harrison Street, Thurmaston. He lived there with his wife Mabel, nee Toon, and their daughter, Edna.

After training he was embarked aboard ship at Southampton and arrived in France on the 31st July 1916, and within a few days he was serving in the field with the 128th Heavy Battery of the R.G.A.

In March 1918 he suffered a hernia, whilst limbering up a gun, and due to this he later spent time in hospital. By the end of 1918 he was returned to the UK. He was eventually released from the army in early 1919, whilst serving at Harrowby Camp, Lincolnshire.

On release from the army Louis returned to his family, who were then living with his mother, Mary Bates, at 311, Main Street, Thurmaston. Gunner, 74638, Louis Bates, R.G.A., was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

Prior to the war Louis Bates had been a goalkeeper for Thurmaston Magpies Football Club.

 

Bates, Walter Smith

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Walter Smith Bates was born in Thurmaston on the 24th December 1889. He was the son of Thurmaston man George Bates, a gas works labourer, and his wife Mary. Walter was the couple's second child. As a young boy Walter lived with his parents and siblings at a house in Berkeley Street, Thurmaston. As a young man Walter worked as a wicker basket maker.

During the Great War Walter Bates served as Acting Corporal, 25476, W. S. Bates, of the Leicestershire Regiment. He married Minnie Jeeves, and had two children, Gladys Mary (1916-1995) and Stanley (1919-1996).

He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

Walter Smith Bates died in Leicestershire on the 8th May 1960. His brothers, Ernest Bates (q.v.) and Bertie Smith Bates (q.v.), also served during the Great War.

Bentley, Archibald Lewis

Archibald Lewis Bentley British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Archibald Lewis Bentley was born in Thurmaston in 1893, the son of Lewis Bentley, a bootmaker, and his wife Lucy.

In 1918 Archibald Lewis Bentley was a resident at 231, Main Street, Thurmaston. At that time he served as Private, 202045, A. L. Bentley, 5th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (The Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment).

He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

Archibald Lewis Bentley died in Leicestershire in 1965.

 

Bentley, Gerald

1914-15 StarBritish War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Gerald Bentley was born in Thurmaston in 1896. He was the son of Thurmaston born William Bentley, a worker in the glove trade, and his wife Harriet, nee Marston. William and Harriet Bentley lived in Thurmaston after their marriage and until about 1900, when they moved to a house at 61, Moira Street, Belgrave, Leicestershire. By 1911 they had moved to 25, Moira Street. At that time Gerald was employed as an office boy by an engineering works.

Gerald Bentley enlisted into the army at Leicester. He first went to France as Private, 16762, G. Bentley, of the Leicestershire Regiment, on the 29th July 1915. However, when he was killed in action on the 26th March 1918 he had become Company Quartermaster Sergeant Gerald Bentley, 6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment.

He is buried in the Ribemont Communal Cemetery Extension (Somme) (Grave II.D.7), France. His overseas war service was recognised by th award of the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal.

 

Bentley, John Wilfred

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

In 1918-1919 John Wilfred Bentley was a resident at 7, Canal Street, Thurmaston. During that time he served as Private, 106361, J. W. Bentley, 8th Battalion The Machine Gun Corps (M.G.C.).

He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

Bentley, John William

 

John William Bentley joined the army on the 25th January 1915 from the National Reserve. At 42 years of age he was an experienced serviceman, having previously served for 12 years with the 2nd Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment.

He was embodied for war service with the 2/5th Leicesters, was promoted to Sergeant on the 1st March 1915, but, at his own request, reverted to Private just over 3 months later. Although born in Thurmaston, John William Bentley lived at 12, Dannett Street, Leicester, with his wife Susannah. His service with the army ended on the 14th July 1916. Private, 20123, Bentley did not serve overseas during the Great War.

 

Bentley, Thomas

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

In 1915 Tom Bentley was a serving soldier with the 10th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. In September of 1916 it was reported in the press that Thomas Bentley of The Green, Syston, Leicestershire, was missing. The following year it was confirmed that Private, 21161, Thomas Bentley, 6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, was killed in action on the 17th July 1916, in France and Flanders. He was born at Thurmaston, enlisted at Leicester, and was a resident of Syston, where he lived with his wife and children. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the missing of the Somme (Pier and Face 2C and 3A), France. He is also commemorated on the War Memorial at Syston, on which his name is recorded as Tom Bentley. He was posthumously awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

 

Bentley, Thomas

 

In 1918 Thomas Bentley was a resident at 11, Church Lane, Thurmaston. At that time he served as a Private soldier with the 23rd Division, 223rd Employment Company of the Labour Corps.

 

Berrington, Harold

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Harold Berrington was born in Leicester on the 14th March 1895. He was the son of John Tom Berrington, a shoe-laster, and his wife Sarah. Mr. and Mrs. Berrington and their seven children moved to Thurmaston in about 1910, when they took-up residence at Laurel House, Herrick's Lane [Humberstone Lane]. In 1911 Harold Berrington worked as a baker's assistant.

Private, GS/17113, Harold Berrington, served with the 21st Lancers during the Great War. He then transferred to the 9th Lancers and by the end of the war he was promoted and served as Corporal, 10785, Harold Berrington. His family home was at 9, Humberstone Lane, Thurmaston.

He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

Harold Berrington died in Leicestershire in 1972.

 

Berrington, George Henry

George Henry Berrington British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

George Henry Berrington, aged 18 years, a shoehand, joined the army during February 1918. He was attested to the army by an officer of the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry at Leicester. Thereafter he served in the army as Driver, 452374, G. H. Berrington, 23rd Company, Army Service Corps (A.S.C.).

He was wounded on the 2nd September 1918, and by the Autumn of 1919 he had been transferred to the army reserve from the 485th Heavy Transport Company of the A.S.C. He was the son of William Henry Berrington, a gas-works labourer, and his wife Elizabeth, of 18, Berkeley Street, Thurmaston, and the younger brother of Joseph Berrington (q.v.). He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

George Henry Berrington's son served in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. To see details of his son click on his name - John Vincent Berrington

To see a larger picture of this man click the following link.

George Henry Berrington

 

Berrington, Joseph

1914-15 StarBritish War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Joseph Berrington was the son of William Henry Berrington, a gasworks labourer, and his wife Elizabeth. The couple's son was born at Thurmaston and baptised in the parish church on the 6th August 1899 by the vicar George Chappell.

Private, 1874, Joseph Berrington, 1/4th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, was killed in action on the 23rd October 1916; he had been wounded twice previously, having served in France from the 2nd March 1915. He had enlisted at Leicester. His home was at 18, Berkeley Street, Thurmaston. He was the elder brother of George Henry Berrington (q.v.).

He is buried in the Bienvillers Military Cemetery (Grave V.C.10), France, and commemorated on the War Memorial at Thurmaston. Additionally, his name was also commemorated on a memorial plaque inside Thurmaston Wesleyan Methodist Chapel.

He was awarded the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

 

Bishop, Alfred

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Alfred Bishop was born in Thurmaston in 1891, the son of John Bishop, a framework knitter, and his wife Emily.

Alfred Bishop's home was at 12, Alexandra Street, Thurmaston. In 1918 he was serving as Driver, 199332, Alfred Bishop, Royal Engineers. His younger brother John Bishop (q.v.) also lived at the same address.

Alfred Bishop went overseas and was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

 

Bishop, John

 

John Bishop was born in Thurmaston in about 1898, the son of John Bishop, a framework knitter, and his wife Emily.

In 1918 John Bishop lived at 12, Alexandra Street, Thurmaston, which was also the home of his elder brother Alfred Bishop (q.v.). Corporal, 10393, John Bishop, served with the 52nd (Grad) Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers.

 

Black, George William

George Black British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

George William Black was born at Thurmaston in 1891. He was the son of Joseph Black and his wife Sarah, nee Smith, and younger brother of John Wilfred Black (q.v.).

George William Black enlisted into the army at Leicester. Lance Corporal, 30144, George William Black, 8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, was killed in action on the 10th October 1918, in France. He is buried in the Rethel French National Cemetery (Grave 1731), France, and commemorated on the War Memorial at Thurmaston. Additionally, his name was also commemorated on a memorial plaque inside Thurmaston Wesleyan Methodist Chapel.

He was posthumously awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

To see a full length photograph of George William Black, taken with another soldier, who is as yet unidentified, click on the link below.

George William Black


Black, John Wilfred

Wilfred Black RNVR

 

John Wilfred Black was born at Thurmaston on the 2nd March 1883. He was the son of Joseph and Sarah Black of Thurmaston. He was also the elder brother of George William Black (q.v.).

Able Seaman, BZ5273, John Wilfred Black was a member of the Bristol Division of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (R.N.V.R.). In 1918 he was entered on the books of H.M.S. President, the headquarters and drillship of the London Division of the R.N.V.R. He was the brother of George William Black (q.v.). John Wilfred Black lived at 367, Main Street, Thurmaston.

To see a near full length photograph of John Wilfred Black and his brother George William Black click on the link below.

John Wilfred Black

 

Blake, James Roland

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

James Roland Blake was born in Thurmaston in 1896. He had joined the army by 1916, prior to which he had worked as a hairdresser. Private, 23136, Blake, first served overseas with the South Staffordshire Regiment. By 1918 Private Blake had been appointed Lance-Corporal with the 2nd Battalion of the South Staffords.

James R. Blake's family home was at 215, Main Street, Thurmaston. He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

James Roland Blake was a member of Thurmaston Conservative Club.

 

Blount, Wilfred John

Wilf Blount British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

John Wilfrid Blount was born in Thurmaston on the 5th November 1892, the son of William Blount, a hosiery glove hand, and his wife Eliza. As a young boy Wilf, as he was known, lived with his parents and elder sisters, in the North End of the village. Prior to the Great War, Wilf lived with his parents at a house in Alexandra street, Thurmaston; and he worked as a wicker cane chair maker.

Under the name of Wilfred John Blount, and describing himself as a 23 years' old cane worker, he was attested to the army on the 18th April 1916. He joined the 12th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment (Midland Pioneers) - serving as Private, 27326, W. J. Blount.

In the space of less than a month, with quick transfers through the 3rd, 12th and 1st Battalions of the Leicesters, he ended up in the 10th Battalion of the regiment and went to France to join the British Expeditionary Force on the 7th September 1916. Thereafter he was transferred to the Rifle Brigade.

The following year, on the 19th February 1917, he was posted missing and was later confirmed as a Prisoner of War. He was released in December 1918.
He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

After the war, in about 1924, Wilf Blount married Hilda Westbury. The couple lived in Thurmaston, where Wilf kept a hairdresser's shop at 217, Main street. John Wifred Blount died in Leicestershire in about 1978.

The photograph at left shows Wilf Blount as he appeared in later life.

 

Bond, Harold Andrew

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Harold Andrew Bond was born in Thurmaston in 1878. His father, Thomas Bond, was the gardener for Captain Henry Jermyn Montgomery Campbell, Royal Artillery, of Thurmaston Hall, Humberstone Lane. The Bond family lived in the lodge house at the Hall. Captain Campbell died in 1893, and Thomas Bond probably moved from the lodge about that time, although he and his wife, and one son, Cecil, continued to live in Thurmaston. By 1901 their son Harold Andrew Bond was working as a gardener at Mentmore, Buckinghamshire.

In 1906 Harold Andrew Bond married barmaid Laura May Woolven, whose parents, William and Mary Ann, had kept the Half Moon Inn, in Warninglid, Sussex.

Harold Andrew Bond enlisted into the army at Brighton during the Great War. He was killed in action on the 26th November 1917, serving as Gunner, 163548, Harold Andrew Bond, with 'D' Battery, 330th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery.

He is commemorated at Perth Cemetery (China Wall) (Ref. V.E.1), Belgium. He is also commemorated on a plaque inside the village hall, Warninglid, where his widow lived.

He was posthumously awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

 

Booth, Harry

 

By 1916, Harry Booth, who was resident at a house on Melton Road, Syston, Leicestershire, had joined His Majesty's Forces.

Harry Booth was a member of Thurmaston Conservative Club.

 

Booth, William

 

Following his attestation to the army, thirty eight year old William Booth, of Wharf Cottages, Thurmaston, was appointed to the Leicestershire Regiment on the 13th October 1915. Private 21075, W. Booth, joined the 10th Battalion of the Regiment. However, his service with the colours was short lived as he became ill as a consequence of having cancer of the tongue. Following a medical board meeting at Stafford, Booth, a basket maker by trade, was approved for permanent discharge from the army on the 5th July 1916. He left the army on the 19th of the month.

 

Broadhurst, Sydney

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal


Sydney Broadhurst enlisted into the army in 1915, aged 19 years. He was the son of Ernest Broadhurst who lived at 268, Main Street, Thurmaston. It was not until October 1917 that Sydney Broadhurst was attested and mobilized for military service.

Initially, he served with the Royal Field Artillery (R.F.A.) and then he transferred to the Army Service Corps (A.S.C.). Whilst serving with the A.S.C. he qualified as a Wireless Electrician and Wireless Fitter. Once qualified he then served in the same trade with the Royal Engineers (RE) as Sapper, 364041, Sydney Broadhurst. He was transferred to the army reserve in 1919. He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

 

Brookes, John Richard

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Private, 22331, John Richard Brookes, 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment), was killed in action on the 30th August 1918, age 19 years. He was born at Leicester, the son of William and Louisa Brookes. He lived at 13, Garden Street, Thurmaston with his wife Evelyn Brookes. Jack Brookes, as he was known, had been in the army from at least 2nd September 1917. Evelyn later lived at 25, Havelock Street, Thurmaston, as Mrs. Evelyn Lewin. He is buried at Vis-en-Artois British Cemetery Haucourt (Grave I.A.32), France, and commemorated on the War Memorial at Thurmaston. He was posthumously awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

 

Broughton, Arthur William

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

By 1915 Arthur William Broughton had joined the army, and served overseas no earlier than 1916. He was a resident at 24, Reading Street, Thurmaston. In 1918 he was serving as Bombardier, 39564, A. W. Broughton, with 'D' Battery of the 152nd (Nottingham) Brigade of the Royal Field Artillery (R.F.A.).

He was awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

Arthur William Broughton was a member of Thurmaston Conservative Club.

 

Brown, John

British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Private, 60431, John Brown, 10th Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 26th September 1917, in France and Flanders. He was born at Thurmaston and enlisted at Leicester. He had formerly served with the Royal Army Service Corps, as Private 223749.

 

Brown, W.

 

W. Brown is commemorated on the War Memorial at Thurmaston.

 

Bunn, Albert Ernest

Albert Bunn British War MedalAllied Victory Medal

 

Albert Ernest Bunn served with the Royal Field Artillery as Gunner L-28931. However, as Gunner, 174162, 351st Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, he was killed in action on the 20th November 1917, aged 27 years. He was born at Leicester and enlisted at Leicester. He was the son of John Henry Bunn and husband of Ellen May Bunn. She later became Mrs. Ellen May Bull and was resident at 10, Leicester Road, Syston, Leicester. He is buried in Ypres Reservoir Cemetery (Grave I.I.142), Belgium, and is commemorated on both Thurmaston and Syston War Memorials. He was posthumously awarded the British War Medal and the Allied Victory Medal for his war service.

Albert Ernest Bunn was one of four brothers that served during the Great War. His brother Private, 8631, George Bunn, 2nd Battalion Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) was killed in action on 24th November 1914, whilst his brother Private, 8013, Edward Bunn, 1st Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 22nd May 1915. His brother Private J. H. Bunn, who served with the Northumberland Fusiliers, was wounded and taken as a prisoner of war. To see images of all four brothers click on the following link

The Bunn brothers

 

Bursnall, Thomas

 

By 1916 Thomas Bursnall joined His Majesty's Forces, he was then living at a house on Reading Street, Thurmaston. He was a member of Thurmaston Conservative Club.

In 1924 Thomas Bursnall and his wife, Lucy, were living at 32, Reading Street.

 

Burton, William Henry

 

By 1916 William Henry Burton, who was licensee of the Unicorn and Star public house, had joined the army. In 1918 Burton was recorded as a resident at 318, Main Street, Thurmaston. At that time he was serving as Private, 65491, W. H. Burton, 3rd Garrison Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.

William Henry Burton was a member of Thurmaston Conservative Club.

 

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